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NCPR News Staff: Brian Mann

Adirondack Bureau Chief
Brian Mann grew up in Alaska, where he fell in love with public radio. In 1999, Brian moved to the Adirondacks and helped launch NCPR's news bureau at Paul Smiths College. "I love the chemistry of water and mountains," Brian says. "But I'm also pretty crazy about village life in the north country. It's the kind of place where you know your neighbors." Brian lives in Saranac Lake with wife Susan and son Nicholas. He's a frequent contributor to NPR and also writes regularly for regional magazines, including Adirondack Life and the Adirondack Explorer. E-mail

Stories filed by Brian Mann

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After the Mill Closes: Revitalizing Southern St. Lawrence County

Brian Mann talks with Sue Avery of the Clifton-Fine Economic Development Corporation about revitalizing the area's economy in the wake of the closing of the Appleton Paper Mills in Newton Falls.  Go to full article

Trying to Save Clifton-Fine Hospital

Saving New York's smallest hospital. Communities in southern St. Lawrence county have been struggling since Appleton Papers closed its mill in Newton Falls last fall. Town leaders had worried that losing the mill could also mean the closure of the Clifton-Fine hospital. Brian Mann reports efforts to save the facility--and more than forty jobs--seem to be paying off.  Go to full article

Plywood Plant Opens in Whitehall

A Canadian company plans to hire sixty-five workers at a plywood factory that's slated to reopen in Whitehall, on the eastern edge of the Adirondack Park. Brian Mann reports that the number of jobs could grow to 130. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

A Spring Morning Walk, With Birds

Brian Mann takes an early morning spring walk in the woods, and found dozens of kinds of birds that call the mountains home.  Go to full article

A Barn-raising in Upper Jay

In the North Country, barns are as much a part of the landscape as mountains and rivers. These days, most new barns are built quickly with steel frames and sheet-metal siding. But some landowners are taking a little more time, using methods and materials passed down over hundreds of years. Brian Mann traveled recently to a traditional barn-raising in Upper Jay.  Go to full article

Activists Worry: Blacks and Hispanics Less Engaged With Wilderness

This holiday weekend, a wave of visitors will hit the Adirondacks. Thousands of tourists and campers will arrive from the cities, fanning out from Old Forge to the High Peaks to Lake George. If there's one thing that these visitors have in common, it's that they're mostly white. Nationwide, blacks and Hispanics have shown little interest in wilderness areas. Activists worry that this trend will have dire consequences in coming years, when whites are no longer in the majority. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

A Tiny College In A Big Wilderness: A Profile of the Wanakena Ranger School

This time of year, thousands of college students in the north country are graduating and preparing to move on. Most have had unique experiences, but few can match the year spent by students at the Ranger school in Wanakena. Brian Mann visited the remote campus, on the shore of Cranberry Lake in the western Adirondacks.  Go to full article

Five Ponds Wilderness: a Journey on the Bog River and the Oswegatchie

One of the classic Adirondack canoe routes begins near Tupper Lake and winds through the Five Ponds Wilderness toward Cranberry Lake. That section of the north country offers some of the most remote forests and rivers in the East. Two of our reporters, Brian Mann and David Sommerstein, made the trip earlier this month. They sent back this audio journal.  Go to full article

Slowing the Spread of Non-native Species

In the North Country, we often hear about non-native invasive species that are spreading in our lakes and rivers. Zebra mussels and Eurasian watermilfoil have been problems here for years. Now, a new effort is underway to slow invasive species that are arriving by land. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

APA Sets New Guidelines for Beaver Control

With the decline of trapping, the north country's beaver population has rebounded dramatically. The animals are an important part of the region's wildlife--but they're also a nuisance for government agencies and many private landowners. The Adirondack Park Agency is establishing new guidelines for people dealing with beavers and the flooding caused by their dams. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

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