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NCPR News Staff: Brian Mann

Adirondack Bureau Chief
Brian Mann grew up in Alaska, where he fell in love with public radio. In 1999, Brian moved to the Adirondacks and helped launch NCPR's news bureau at Paul Smiths College. "I love the chemistry of water and mountains," Brian says. "But I'm also pretty crazy about village life in the north country. It's the kind of place where you know your neighbors." Brian lives in Saranac Lake with wife Susan and son Nicholas. He's a frequent contributor to NPR and also writes regularly for regional magazines, including Adirondack Life and the Adirondack Explorer. E-mail

Stories filed by Brian Mann

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Fire Crews Battle Dozens of Blazes

In the last week, volunteer fire crews and state forest rangers have battled more than two dozen blazes across the north country. This spring's unseasonably dry, hot weather is expected to continue and officials worry that more fires are coming. As Brian Mann reports, trees damaged by the ice storm of 1998 are adding fuel to these fires.  Go to full article

Forest Fire in Town of Keene

The latest Adirondack forest fire claimed ten acres in the town of Keene yesterday. Firefighters responded to reports of smoke just after 2 o'clock. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

Train Sparks Wildfire in Essex

High winds and dry weather have led to a rash of wildfires in the North Country this week. Nearly 500 acres of timber and farmland burned in the towns of Essex and Willsboro yesterday. The blaze was started by sparks thrown from a passing train. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

Firefighters Contain Lake Placid Blaze

Forest rangers and volunteer departments contain a forest fire in Lake Placid yesterday afternoon. Brian Mann reports  Go to full article

America's Largest Superfund Site: The Hudson River, Part 3

In the final part of our series on PCB contamination in the Hudson River, Brian Mann looks at the damage to the environment...and at GE's claim that the river is slowly cleaning itself.  Go to full article

America?s Largest Superfund Site: The Hudson River, Part 2

This summer, the Environmental Protection Agency will decide whether tons of PCBs should be dredged from the Hudson River. At the center of the debate are questions about the chemical's affect on human health. In this second part of our series on the Hudson River, Brian Mann looks at the volatile mix of science and public opinion that will shape the EPA's decision.  Go to full article

Domtar Buys Georgia-Pacific Mills

Canadian-based Domtar Incorporated, the largest landowner in the Adirondacks, plans to buy four paper mills owned by Georgia-Pacific. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

America's Largest Superfund Site: The Hudson River, Pt. 1

New York's Hudson River is the largest toxic waste site in the United States. PCBs dumped decades ago from a pair of General Electric factories summer, the Environmental Protection Agency will decide whether GE have contaminated the Hudson over a two hundred mile area. This should pay to clean up the river--at a cost of $460 million. Environmental groups support the clean up. But the corporation and many local residents are fighting to stop it. In this first of a three-part series, Brian Mann looks at the fierce battle being waged over the Hudson's future.  Go to full article

Lake Placid Frat Fight Ends in Arrests

A fistfight in Lake Placid this weekend resulted in injuries and arrests of fraternity brothers from Plattsburgh. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

Adirondack ARC, Helping Families Cope with Developmental Disability, Pt. 2

Brian Mann has the second of two stories about challenges for rural families raising children with disabilities. We visit one of the Adirondack ARC's group homes in Malone, and hear from kids who have risen to leadership roles inside the organization.

For further information on programs for the developmentally disabled contact: Parent to Parent of New York State (800-603-6778) and Parent to Parent of Vermont (802-655-5290 or 800-800-4005).  Go to full article

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