Skip Navigation
r e g i o n a l   n e w s
on:

NCPR is supported by:

This is a Visitor-Supported website.

NCPR News Staff: Brian Mann

Adirondack Bureau Chief
Brian Mann grew up in Alaska, where he fell in love with public radio. In 1999, Brian moved to the Adirondacks and helped launch NCPR's news bureau at Paul Smiths College. "I love the chemistry of water and mountains," Brian says. "But I'm also pretty crazy about village life in the north country. It's the kind of place where you know your neighbors." Brian lives in Saranac Lake with wife Susan and son Nicholas. He's a frequent contributor to NPR and also writes regularly for regional magazines, including Adirondack Life and the Adirondack Explorer. E-mail

Stories filed by Brian Mann

Show             
Slain civil rights worker Andrew Goodman spent summers in Tupper Lake. Photo: public domain
Slain civil rights worker Andrew Goodman spent summers in Tupper Lake. Photo: public domain

Goodman Mountain a northern monument to civil rights hero

Last weekend marked the fiftieth anniversary of the murder of Andrew Goodman in Mississippi.

The young man with long ties to Tupper Lake had traveled south to take part in the "Freedom Summer." His goal was to help African-Americans register to vote. He was killed along with two other activists.

In the days before their deaths in Mississippi, in 1964, two civil rights activists from New York State visited the Adirondacks.

Michael Schwerner, who was 24 years old, vacationed with friends on Great Sacandaga Lake. Andrew Goodman, who was twenty, visited his family's retreat, Shelter Cove Camp, on Tupper Lake.  Go to full article
APA commissioner Richard Booth (at right) talking with APA chair Lani Ulrich (L). Booth will serve another 4-year-term on the APA commission. NCPR file photo: Brian Mann.
APA commissioner Richard Booth (at right) talking with APA chair Lani Ulrich (L). Booth will serve another 4-year-term on the APA commission. NCPR file photo: Brian Mann.

Lawmakers confirm Booth to APA board, Lack to ORDA

In the final days of the session, lawmakers in Albany approved the appointments of some key leaders of Adirondack organizations.

The Olympic Regional Development Authority will see a top national broadcast executive join its board. And a respected environmentalist has been confirmed for another four-year term on the Adirondack Park Agency commission.  Go to full article

How the Prison Time Media Project was born

NCPR's Adirondack Bureau Chief Brian Mann is in Washington, DC for an awards ceremony tomorrow where reporting from NCPR's Prison Time Media Project will receive honors.

For more than a year Brian and Natasha Haverty have been digging deep into the culture of incarceration and fallout from the laws that launched the "war on drugs" back in the 1970s.

Brian talks with Todd Moe about how and why the project was started.  Go to full article
Governor Nelson Rockefeller surprised his own staff with his dramatic shift on drug policy.
Governor Nelson Rockefeller surprised his own staff with his dramatic shift on drug policy.

Murrow Award: How Rockefeller drug laws changed America

This spring North Country Public Radio's news team has been honored with several major national awards for some of the work we've brought you over the past year. Much of that recognition has gone to our Prison Time Media Project, which over a year and a half has looked in-depth at the growth of the prison industry here in our region, across New York and around the country.

The series unfolded as the country was beginning to take another look at the way we think about crime, and justice, and these stories became part of that national conversation. The first story of the series has just received one of the top honors in journalism: a National Edward R. Murrow award.

In January of 1973, New York Gov. Nelson Rockefeller launched his campaign for what came to be known as the Rockefeller drug laws. Rockefeller demanded tough prison sentences, even for low-level drug dealers and addicts. It was an idea that quickly spread, influencing state and Federal law across the US.

In this first story, Brian Mann takes us back to the beginning, when New Yorkers were demanding solutions to a heroin epidemic that was scarring urban neighborhoods.  Go to full article
Grace Hudowalski chatting on Whiteface Mountain at the age of 98.  Photo provided by Adirondack 46er Club.
Grace Hudowalski chatting on Whiteface Mountain at the age of 98. Photo provided by Adirondack 46er Club.

Adirondack peak East Dix is now named Grace Peak. Here's why

One of the Adirondack Park's High Peaks has a new name. Last week, the US Board of Geographic Names approved a petition to rename East Dix, a summit that rises to 4,026 feet.

The summit in the Dix Range in the Essex County town of North Hudson will now be known as "Grace Peak" in honor of Grace Hudowalski, a founding member of the Adirondack 46er hiking club and a long-time activist in the Park.

The name change follows a twelve-year campaign by the 46ers that was joined by local government leaders and other groups.

Douglas Arnold, who led the effort, issued a statement last week describing Grace Hudowalski as "a mentor to thousands of people as she shared her enthusiasm for the Adirondacks."

Hudowalski passed away in 2004 at the age of 98.

This is the first time since 1973 that a High Peak has been renamed. In that case, Mount Marshall was named to recognize environmental activist Bob Marshall.  Go to full article
Andy Flynn on an exercise walk May 11th near Saranac Lake.  Photo:  Andy Flynn, used with permission
Andy Flynn on an exercise walk May 11th near Saranac Lake. Photo: Andy Flynn, used with permission

In public battle to lose weight, victories and dark days

Back in January, we profiled Andy Flynn, a veteran Adirondack journalist now with the Lake Placid News who's been publicly documenting his effort to lose weight and live a more healthy lifestyle.

Beginning in December 2013, Flynn launched a column and blog describing his efforts to lose more than 200 pounds. He sat down recently with our Adirondack bureau chief Brian Mann to give an update on his journey, which has seen enormous victories and also some dark, difficult days.  Go to full article
Elise Stefanik. Photo: Stefanik Campaign, via <a href="http://www.libertarianrepublican.net/2013/12/spunky-millennial-elise-stefanik-makes.html">libertarianrepublican.net</a>
Elise Stefanik. Photo: Stefanik Campaign, via libertarianrepublican.net

What Elise Stefanik's Harvard writings tell us about her politics

If Elise Stefanik goes to Washington, D.C., next year as the North Country's Representative -- and that's still a big if, given the big primary challenge from fellow Republican Matt Doheny and the Democratic campaign now forming around Aaron Woolf -- she'll make the journey eight years after leaving Harvard, where she studied at the Institute of Politics, serving as the student vice president of the Institute, and working as an editorial writer for the Harvard Crimson.

In the years since, Stefanik, now just 29, has worked hard to advance the policies and ideas of other Republican politicians, serving most notably under George W. Bush and Paul Ryan. But during her time at Harvard she wrote essays and gave interviews that offer some insight into her own values, her personality and her own political concerns (get to know today's Stefanik here.) Here are the big takeaways.  Go to full article
Newcomer Elise Stefanik is running strong against established Republican candidate Matt Doheny.  Photo: Stefanik campaign
Newcomer Elise Stefanik is running strong against established Republican candidate Matt Doheny. Photo: Stefanik campaign

NY21: Is Elise Stefanik a fresh new voice or a carpetbagger?

We're just a month away from the Republican primary in the North Country's fiercely-contested House race.

The Democratic and Green Party candidates are running unopposed in their primaries June 24. But Republicans Matt Doheny and Elise Stefanik have been locked in an expensive and sometimes bitter matchup that's involved accusations of carpetbagging and dishonesty.

The first debate between Doheny and Stefanik takes place May 27. This week, we begin profiling the two GOP candidates. Here's Brian Mann and Martha Foley's conversation about Elise Stefanik's life story, her background, and her political ideas (read more about Stefanik's political writing here.)  Go to full article

Lake George's tourism transformation

The summer tourism season is slowly coming awake across the North Country. One of the big hotspots will be Lake George, which is in the middle of a building boom. Community leaders hope to see a kind of growth that will extend the village's visitor economy into the fall and winter months.  Go to full article
New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli. Photo: <a href="http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:New_York_State_Comptroller_Thomas_P._DiNapoli.jpg">Awhill34</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli. Photo: Awhill34, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Altona bookkeeper accused of stealing public money

State officials say a former town book-keeper in Altona in Clinton County embezzled $23,500 of taxpayer money. The alleged wrong-doing was found in an audit released yesterday by the New York State Comptroller's office.  Go to full article

« first   « previous 10   31-40 of 2925 stories   next 10 »   last »