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Looking for the North Country: How do we create a sense of place? Call-in #3

We continue our series of five radio call-in conversations about the place, the people, the history and the local culture we call North Country. Tonight we explore the question: How do we create a sense of place?--and look at the oral and written traditions, and musical heritage of the region. In the studio are series host NCPR news director Martha Foley, TAUNY executive director Varick Chittenden, Doug Welch, a book collector, bibliographer, and librarian at Canton College, and writer Chris Angus of Canton. Joining them by phone from WAMC in Albany are folklorist Vaughan Ward, director of the Black Crow network, a regional cultural services group, and Vaughan's husband, George, who's also a folklorist, as well a collector and performer of regional traditional music.  Go to full article

Looking for the North Country: Latter-Day Homesteaders

From 1970 to 1980 the population of St. Lawrence County grew by more than 2,000 people. It's hard to say by just reading the Census Bureau figures how many of those were latter-day homesteaders. But in one neighborhood in Rossie, in the southern part of the county, plenty were. Two hundred new people moved to Rossie during the '70s. Many were part of a tight-knit community that included John and Liz Scarlett. Jody Tosti visits this one couple who came back to the land, and stayed.  Go to full article

Looking for the North Country: Who is the North Country? Call-in #2

Tonight we continue our series of five radio conversations about the place, the people, the history and the local culture we call North Country. Tonight we explore the question: Who is the North Country? In the studio are series host NCPR news director Martha Foley, TAUNY executive director Varick Chittenden, who first proposed we ask our questions about regional identity and sense of place. Susan Ouilette, a historian, native of the Champlain Valley and a teacher at St. Michael's College in Vermont, Laurie Rush, cultural anthropologist based along the St. Lawrence River in Clayton, and Amy Godine, a journalist and freelance writer who has written extensively about the ethnic history of the Adirondack-North Country.  Go to full article

Looking for the North Country: That's Where I Live

Our North Country Identity series prompted response from many listeners, including these thoughts from John Greene, a retired biology professor and naturalist for the Nature Conservancy who lives in Canton.  Go to full article

Looking for the North Country: You'll Know It When You Leave It

Canton mayor Bob Wells observes that while much about the North Country has changed, much remains as it always has been.  Go to full article

Looking for the North Country: A Place Apart

Some people say isolation is the North Country's greatest curse. Others say it's our greatest blessing. But what is it, really? Neal Burdick, Associate Director of Communications for St. Lawrence University weighs in with his view of isolation.  Go to full article

Looking for the North Country: Where is the North Country? Call-in #1

The first in a series of five radio call-in conversations about the place, the people, the history and the local culture we call North Country. The programs are produced in cooeration with TAUNY - Traditional Arts of Upstate New York, and supported in part by the new York State Council on the Humanities. We explore questions about regional identity in the northern section of upstate New York. Tonight's topic - WHERE IS THE NORTH COUNTRY? In the studio are series host, NCPR news director Martha Foley, TAUNY executive director Varick Chittenden, Art Johnson, professor of history at the State University College at Potsdam, Terry DeFranco Martino, executive director of the Adirondack North Country Association, and Tom Van De Water, science teacher at Canton High School.  Go to full article

Looking for the North Country: Some nutshell views

NCPR and TAUNY, Traditional Arts of Upstate New York, spent October 2000 exploring the place, the people and the culture we call the North Country. The idea was to use the reach of the radio station, from Canada to Glens Falls and from the St. Lawrence River into Vermont, to see what people who live here have to say about regional identity and the question of place.  Go to full article

Regional History Call-in: Summer Camp

Martha Foley is joined by Halle Bond of The Adirondack Museum, which plans an exhibition on children's summer camps, and Amy Godine, a journalist with an interest in ethnic summer camps. They share camp stories and take calls from listeners.  Go to full article

Fractured Family

Illegal gambling casinos flourished on the St. Regis Mohawk reservation in the 1980s. But the issue of gambling and how it fit into Mohawk traditions and laws, and state and federal law, deeply divided the community there.
Two hundred New York State Police officers raided the casinos in mid-July 1989. They blockaded the reservation, restricting traffic on and off the reserve.
An armed ad hoc Mohawk security force, the Warrior Society, emerged.
Gunfire became common, directed at the power supply of a casino, or at the patrol car of police known to oppose gambling. Within months, most of the gambling halls were open again. Under an agreement worked out between tribal leaders, the Warriors and Gov. Mario Cuomo, state police didn't venture onto Mohawk territory without checking in with the Warrior Society.
The bitter dispute continued. It came to a head in May of 1990, when gunfire killed two Mohawks, bringing New York and Canadian police onto the territory en masse.
In early 1990, North Country Public Radio aired an hour long documentary we called "The Fractured Family: Gambling at Akwesasne," after extensive interviews and research inside and outside the Mohawk community, and its traditional and non-traditional factions. The Fractured Family was written and produced by Pat McKeown and Martha Foley. Production engineer was Beverly Hickman.  Go to full article

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