Skip Navigation
r e g i o n a l   n e w s
on:

NCPR is supported by:

This is a Visitor-Supported website.

NCPR News Staff: Lucy Martin

Ottawa Correspondent
Lucy Martin covers regional news and events from her home in rural Ottawa. Her radio roots go back to the early years of Hawaii Public Radio, where she had many roles, including news anchor and station announcer. A family move traded ordinary Honolulu for exotic Canada in 1999. Lucy enjoys village life with her husband, Craig Miller. When not editing sound or text on her laptop, she likes to garden, read, travel and play outdoors. E-mail

Stories filed by Lucy Martin

Show             
CJHR volunteer Mary Alice Enright with Dai Bassett and Bill Parker
CJHR volunteer Mary Alice Enright with Dai Bassett and Bill Parker

"The People's voice" CJHR celebrates Ottawa Valley Heritage

All sorts of radio stations these days are busy blending old content with modern technology. Staying relevant, while reaching out to new listeners.

Take CJHR, a non-profit station in Renfrew, Ontario. "Valley Heritage Radio" serves up an eclectic mix for a mostly-rural audience. The format is at least half Canadian content, and about 20% of that is local. The station saves space for something called Ottawa Valley music, a country style influenced by Celtic and French roots, refined in lumber camps that once spanned the region.

Lucy Martin dropped by the CJHR booth at the Ottawa Valley Farm Show in March to hear how they're making community radio happen.  Go to full article
Hakmet product specialist Jeff Lancaster. (Photo: Lucy Martin)
Hakmet product specialist Jeff Lancaster. (Photo: Lucy Martin)

Curiosity fuels Ottawa's farm show

The Ottawa Valley Farm Show recently marked its 85th year with a three-day run at the new CE Centre next to Ottawa's main airport. This event started as a seed fair in Pembroke and grew into the largest farm show in Eastern Ontario.

As you'd expect, a lot of the space is devoted to pitching shiny new machinery. Lucy Martin stopped at the Hakmet display to ask vendor Jeff Lancaster how these big shows work from his side of the booth.  Go to full article
Finance Minister Jim Flaherty, House of Commons photo
Finance Minister Jim Flaherty, House of Commons photo

Canadian federal budget proposes cuts and changes

Canada's Finance minister Jim Flaherty unveiled the federal government's budget for 2012 in Ottawa yesterday afternoon. Although overall cuts were less than expected, the government announced plans to reduce spending by $5.2 billion per year over the next three years, and eliminate just over nineteen thousand public sector jobs. One-third of those job reductions are expected to occur in the Ottawa-Gatineau area.

The proposed budget also includes phased changes in eligibility for old age benefits, higher tax exemptions for shopping outside of Canada and elimination of the humble penny. Lucy Martin has more.  Go to full article
Furs traveled from the north via sled and bateau. Photos courtesy of the Hudson's Bay Company Archives
Furs traveled from the north via sled and bateau. Photos courtesy of the Hudson's Bay Company Archives

1919 film: "Treasures of the Far Fur Country"

In 1919, two intrepid cameramen left New York City to trek across the Canadian North. Traveling by foot, canoe, dog sled and icebreaker they filmed scenes from Hudson's Bay Company communities for that sponsor's upcoming 250th anniversary.

The finished two-hour movie was seen in Canada the following year. But once "talkies" took hold, interest in silent film faded. The original footage ended up tucked away in England, largely forgotten.

A collaborative project has been working to recover the film's source material for Canadians and the world. Some of the best segments will be shown April 3rd in a screening booked at the Canadian Museum of Civilization.

To learn more, Lucy Martin reached filmmaker and event organizer Kevin Nikkel in Winnipeg.  Go to full article
A snow sculpture in Snowflake Village, Gatineau Park. Photo: Judy Andrus Toporcer, Pierrepont NY.
A snow sculpture in Snowflake Village, Gatineau Park. Photo: Judy Andrus Toporcer, Pierrepont NY.

Winterlude 2012's final weekend: soggy fun?

Organizers of Ottawa's big three-week winter festival have learned from long experience there's just no counting on the weather. Take this year: a mild opening weekend. Then a chilly one. And now, a bit of a melt-down.

The Rideau Canal was closed on Thursday as temperatures reached the upper 30s, with another mild forecast on tap for today.

Winterlude's final weekend includes a provincial holiday "Family Day" on Monday, giving residents and visitors three full days to take in a wide range of indoor and outdoor activities. Lucy Martin has more.  Go to full article
Joanna Dean and Will Knight with a cross-section of a 154-year-old bur oak, cut to permit denser development despite protests from area residents.
Joanna Dean and Will Knight with a cross-section of a 154-year-old bur oak, cut to permit denser development despite protests from area residents.

Ottawa exhibit considers the "Urban Forest"

One city's relationship with trees is explored in a new museum exhibit in Ottawa.

Six moments in the history of an urban forest is the brainchild of Carleton University history professor Joanna Dean and graduate student Will Knight.

Present-day Ottawa began as rough riverside lumber shanties in the early 1800s. It grew to become the nation's capital, with various trends in tree clearing and tree planting along the way. More recently, the area has faced damage from natural disaster and invasive pests, like the emerald ash borer, which threatens perhaps 30% of Ottawa's existing tree population.

Although the display considers urban forestry from an Ottawa perspective, the challenge of combining trees with cities is universal. Lucy Martin spoke with co-curators, Joanna Dean and Will Knight on opening day at the Bytown Museum, beside the treed slopes of Parliament Hill.  Go to full article
John Sullivan piping the haggis in Burritts Rapids, Ontario
John Sullivan piping the haggis in Burritts Rapids, Ontario

Heard Up North: John Sullivan, piper

Not all pipers start young - and they aren't all Scottish either.

John Sullivan came to Canada from England back in 1952. Today he lives in Ottawa and pipes in neighboring Kemptville. Sullivan took up bagpipes later in life, almost on a whim. This past Wednesday, he helped pipe in the haggis for a Robbie Burns luncheon held in Burritts Rapids, Ontario.

Prior to reciting the traditional "Address to a Haggis", Sullivan told Lucy Martin how he reached this point. Sullivan is today's Heard Up North.  Go to full article
Hugh Graham (left) and a fellow kick sledder, Jan. 2011. Photo: Lucy Martin
Hugh Graham (left) and a fellow kick sledder, Jan. 2011. Photo: Lucy Martin

Heard Up North: Hugh Graham, long-time canal fan

Part of Ottawa's Rideau Canal Skateway opened for skating this past Sunday, kicking off its 42nd season. Once weather permits, nearly five miles of frozen canal will see heavy use for another month or two. The free skateway is a star attraction for Winterlude, coming up February 3-20. Sunday, just a short section was open, and the ice conditions were listed as poor.

Long time canal enthusiast Hugh Graham keeps a kick sled on hand for bad ice days. The sled looks like a light kitchen chair on long, thin runners. Wearing home-made studded boots, he can ride the runner with one foot, and push along at a good clip with the other. There's even room for some gear or a light passenger on the chair. Graham showed off his kick sled to Lucy Martin for today's Heard Up North.  Go to full article
Maude Roy and her husband Wendell Joyce in their farm kitchen
Maude Roy and her husband Wendell Joyce in their farm kitchen

Sunflower Farm CSA "beefs up" Ontario food banks

Community Supported Agriculture programs, or CSAs, have become a familiar consumer choice. Growers reduce financial risk by selling shares in advance of the season's production. Share-holders get regular baskets of fresh-picked vegetables, without all the weeding and watering.

Done right, CSAs help people eat better and get to know local farmers. But the model doesn't always include meat, or help those with no money to spare.

A family farm near Oxford Mills, Ontario has established a CSA that takes those gaps into account. Shares in Sunflower Farm cover the cost of producing beef. The meat goes to feed the hungry through charitable organizations. Shareholders don't get a bite. Just a warm feeling - and a tax receipt for their donation.

Lucy Martin spoke with Wendall Joyce and his wife Maude Roy about their project - and creating links that help rural and urban dwellers alike.  Go to full article
Christine and Stuart Blais finish a shift collecting donations for the Poppy Fund
Christine and Stuart Blais finish a shift collecting donations for the Poppy Fund

Heard Up North: Poppy Drive volunteers Christine and Stuart Blais

This is poppy time across Canada. The bright red flower is widely worn leading into Remembrance Day ceremonies, held in many communities on November 11th.

Besides symbolizing support for military service and sacrifice, the humble stick pin generates millions of dollars in donations to aid veterans.

For today's Heard Up North Lucy Martin dropped by a grocery store in Barrhaven, Ontario, where Christine and Stuart Blais were collecting for the cause.  Go to full article

« first   « previous 10   21-30 of 213 stories   next 10 »   last »