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NCPR News Staff: Nora Flaherty

Digital Editor, News

Nora Flaherty began her career in public radio as a reporter and on-air host at Michigan Radio, where she did stories on environmental issues, housing, the arts, among other things. Nora moved to New York City in 2005, and became a producer at WFUV. At WFUV, Nora hosted a weekly interview program and reported on the long-term issues faced by September 11th survivors, education, and less serious topics like fairy tales, freak shows and pop music.

At NCPR, Nora has hosted the daily news program All Before Five, and reported on local politics, the arts, agriculture and entrepreneurship. She has recently taken on a new role as Digital Editor for News.

Nora’s work has won awards from the Associated Press, New York State Broadcasters Association, and Public Radio News Directors, Inc., as well as a Gracie Award.

A serious dog person, Nora loves hanging out with her "pack" (her husband and their two dogs), cooking, and driving in foreign countries. E-mail

Stories filed by Nora Flaherty

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Farmer John Peck, of Peck Homestead Farm in Champion, in Jefferson County, is worried about how steadily rising property taxes are affecting his livelihood. Photo: Joanna Richards
Farmer John Peck, of Peck Homestead Farm in Champion, in Jefferson County, is worried about how steadily rising property taxes are affecting his livelihood. Photo: Joanna Richards

Could the two percent ag land tax cap hurt non-farmers?

New York farmers are closely watching the fate of a bill in Albany that would cap assessments of their land at a two percent increase per year. That's compared to the current 10 percent per year.

Agricultural land is assessed according to the crops growing on it. And corn and soybean prices have been soaring. But lots of farmers might not see profits from those high prices, and many say they're paying a lot more in taxes, without taking in a lot more money.  Go to full article
House on County Route 11 in Depauville, NY. The house has since burned down, and photos can be found on the house's page at OABNNY. Photo: <a href="http://oabonny.com/indexpage9.htm">Old Abandoned Buildings of Northern New York</a>
House on County Route 11 in Depauville, NY. The house has since burned down, and photos can be found on the house's page at OABNNY. Photo: Old Abandoned Buildings of Northern New York

Watertown man preserves "Old Abandoned Buildings" with web site

We've all driven down the highway in the North Country and been amazed that some structure by the side of the road was still standing. Maybe it used to be a barn, a house, or a gas station, but it's been left to the elements, and these days it's an old abandoned building.

For the past eight years, Jefferson County resident and web designer Marc Mosher has been chronicling just such buildings on a web site called "Old Abandoned Buildings of Northern New York" (also known as OABNNY.) He describes the site as a combination of photography, urban exploration, and history.

Mosher grew up exploring abandoned buildings with his father, and when he got older he combined that interest with his profession to create OABNNY in 2004. He answered our questions about OABNNY via email.  Go to full article
TC Boyle. Photo: Spencer Boyle, via <a href="http://www.tcboyle.com/index.html">TCBoyle.com</a>
TC Boyle. Photo: Spencer Boyle, via TCBoyle.com

TC Boyle: Back in Potsdam again

Writer TC Boyle will be at SUNY Potsdam Thursday evening for a reading as part of Potsdam's Lougheed Festival of the Arts. He'll also be introducing student writers on Friday night.

After growing up in Westchester County, Boyle graduated from SUNY Potsdam in 1968.  Go to full article
A homecoming ceremony at Fort Drum. NCPR file photo
A homecoming ceremony at Fort Drum. NCPR file photo

SUNY-Fort Drum program to train those on the "front lines" with returning soldiers

A new program from SUNY Oswego is looking to train people who work with Fort Drum's soldiers in the basics of mental health and counseling. It's starting with a course that's being taught right now at Fort Drum, "Trauma management and stewardship."

Fort Drum is home to the 10th Mountain Division, one of the most heavily deployed units in the US. When those soldiers return home from overseas, they can suffer from a range of physical and mental problems connected to their service, like post-traumatic stress disorder, mental issues associated with bodily injuries, and traumatic brain injuries.  Go to full article
The Black River Rollers strike a pose. Photo: Nora Flaherty
The Black River Rollers strike a pose. Photo: Nora Flaherty

What's so great about roller derby?

Roller derby has a surprisingly long history: It first emerged as a contact sport in the late 1930s; started broadcasting on TV in the late '40s; and had a bit of a TV revival in the '80s and '90s.

The sport as we know it today is mostly an all-female, woman-organized amateur sport. This most recent incarnation got its start in the early 2000s, in Austin, Texas.  Go to full article
TAUNY Executive Director Jill Breit at the TAUNY Center's Folk Store in Canton. Photo: Nora Flaherty
TAUNY Executive Director Jill Breit at the TAUNY Center's Folk Store in Canton. Photo: Nora Flaherty

How the North Country can support artists, grow economy

The North Country's Regional Economic Development Council has been one of the most successful in the state. It's received top awards twice now, for projects that range from renovating an historic building in Port Henry, to making improvements to the Wild Center in Tupper Lake, to treating wastewater in Malone.

Several of the projects the state funded aim to improve the North Country's economic outlook through the arts. One of these is "Invisible Factory", a project whose goal is to support regional artisans, and help them make a living from what they do.

"Invisible Factory" is a partnership between Traditional Arts in Upstate New York, in Canton, and the Adirondack North Country Association, in Saranac Lake.

Nora Flaherty stopped by TAUNY, to learn more about Invisible Factory.  Go to full article
A tanker trucks transports water for hydrofracking operations in Susquehanna County, Pa. In his letter, Dr. Nirav Shah says some other states didn't seriously study health concerns before allowing hydrofracking. Photo: Marie Cusick
A tanker trucks transports water for hydrofracking operations in Susquehanna County, Pa. In his letter, Dr. Nirav Shah says some other states didn't seriously study health concerns before allowing hydrofracking. Photo: Marie Cusick

NYS fracking health study won't make its deadline

It looks like the decision on whether to allow large-scale hydraulic fracturing in New York state will probably be delayed. In a letter this afternoon, State Health Commissioner Nirav Shah wrote his department needs more time to investigate fracking's potential health impacts. Shah said that's because the issues they're considering are very complex.  Go to full article

Elvis definitely still in De Peyster

Today is Elvis Presley's birthday...he was born on this day in 1935. But for some, every day is about celebrating the King.

Shirley Gagnon is one such fan. She's the owner of the "Memories of Elvis" museum in De Peyster. The museum got its start as Shirley's personal collection of Elvis memorabilia, but when the collection got too big for Shirley's family home next door, she and her husband bought a mobile home and "Memories of Elvis" was born.

The museum opened to the public in 1997, and since then people have come from as far as England to see Shirley's collection of Elvis plates, dolls, clocks, tapestries, and much, much more.  Go to full article
An Amish farm near Heuvelton, NY. Photo: Karen Johnson-Weiner
An Amish farm near Heuvelton, NY. Photo: Karen Johnson-Weiner

Old Christmas an old tradition for many Amish in the North Country

For most of us, Jan. 1 marks the end of the holiday season, whether that's a sad goodbye or a relief.

But for some Christians, including many of the Amish people in the North Country, Jan. 6 is another day of celebration: Epiphany, or "Old Christmas."

Karen Johnson-Weiner is a professor of linguistic Anthropology at SUNY Potsdam. She's been working with the North County's Amish for years.  Go to full article
Abby with Charlene Romano, Mary France and Santa (Paul Bizaya). Photo: Nora Flaherty
Abby with Charlene Romano, Mary France and Santa (Paul Bizaya). Photo: Nora Flaherty

Heard Up North: Santa meets dogs and cats in Ogdensburg

Getting your kids' pictures taken with Santa Claus has been a longtime holiday ritual for many. In recent years another group has begun vying for Santa's attention--pets--and a picture of an awkward dog or an annoyed looking cat in Father Christmas' lap has become a fairly common site on the mantle.

In Ogdensburg on the day after Thanksgiving last year, Amvets Auxiliary post 19 invited people to come out to Tractor Supply with their pets to meet Santa. The event was a benefit for St. Jude Children's research hospital. Nora Flaherty's dog gets nervous in crowds, so she stayed home--but Nora did bring her recorder for this Heard Up North:  Go to full article

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