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NCPR News Staff: Julie Grant

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Stories filed by Julie Grant

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Lake-effect snow, how it works. Source: Wikipedia
Lake-effect snow, how it works. Source: Wikipedia

Tug Hill to get lion's share of lake effect snow

The Tug Hill area will get the lion's share of the lake effect snow - more than 2 feet - over the next couple of days. Bill Hibbert is a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Buffalo. He says we're in the midst the biggest lake effect snowstorm this winter. Hibbert says it's coming because it's cold out there.  Go to full article

Colton supervisor says too much emphasis on Rooftop Highway

Town leaders in Colton say the north country is putting too much emphasis on a so-called Rooftop Highway, and not enough on short term economic development projects. The highway idea, which some have dubbed I-98, is to build a four lane interstate from Watertown around to Plattsburgh.

Colton Town Supervisor Lawrence Patzwald says there are many ways to boost the region's economy.  Go to full article
Santa in a window display. Some families wrestle with the question of how much to give each holiday season. Photo: Mark Brush
Santa in a window display. Some families wrestle with the question of how much to give each holiday season. Photo: Mark Brush

Debating Holiday Consumerism

A lot of people don't want to get caught up in the consumerism of the holidays. But often family and friends expect to get gifts from loved ones. Julie Grant spent time with one family where gift-giving is a real struggle.  Go to full article
All Before Five program page
All Before Five program page

All Before Five: 12/20/11

The water resources of the Great Lakes could help revive the economy, Brian Mann reports as part of WBEZ's Front and Center series. The Potsdam Synagogue wants to add menorah's to holiday displays.  Go to full article
Sharon Williams wants to see more menorahs around the North Country.
Sharon Williams wants to see more menorahs around the North Country.

Potsdam Synagogue adds menorahs to holiday displays

Like most of America, the North Country is lit up with Christmas decorations at this time of year. While it brings joy to many people, it can make others feel like outsiders. Julie Grant reports about an effort by the synagogue in Potsdam to make the season more inclusive - by adding menorahs to holiday displays.  Go to full article
The police department is going to... have an extra presence indefinitely, until we feel we're back to normal.

Watertown police, schools trace gun threat

Watertown police continue to work with the Watertown City School District to find out who threatened to bring a gun to school earlier this week.  Go to full article

Watertown High School students return to school after Facebook rumor kept many home

A lot more kids made it to school today at Watertown High School, than did yesterday. About 50% of students stayed home yesterday after rumors on Facebook led many to believe a student would be coming to school with a gun. Absenteeism was at about 25% today.  Go to full article
Santa told my grandson that Rudolph and the other reindeers had been playing reindeer games, and... knocked the train off the tracks."

Polar Express derails

The Polar Express train ride to see Santa Claus might have been even more memorable than usual - when it went off the rails on the way to the North Pole last night. More than 300 children and adults were on the train. The Utica Fire Department says there was one minor injury, but otherwise no one was hurt.  Go to full article
(Photo: Jon Rosales)  Shaktoolik in January, from the air as you'd approach the village. It sits on a gravel bar no more than 80 yards wide.
(Photo: Jon Rosales) Shaktoolik in January, from the air as you'd approach the village. It sits on a gravel bar no more than 80 yards wide.

SLU Professor calls for climate assistance for Alaskan villages

Delegates from nearly 200 countries have been meeting over the past two weeks in South Africa for the United Nations Convention on climate change. St. Lawrence University professor Jon Rosales just returned from Durban. He's been advocating on behalf of villages on the Bering Strait, on the west coast of Alaska, which are the focus of his research. Julie Grant has more.  Go to full article
Figure 1.6a Projected change in annual temperature for the 2080s in the Northeast relative to the 1980s baseline period. (NYSERDA Report)
Figure 1.6a Projected change in annual temperature for the 2080s in the Northeast relative to the 1980s baseline period. (NYSERDA Report)

Climate report predicts changes for northern NY farms

One of the lead investigators of the recent report on climate change in New York says the heavy storms this spring and summer, and the mild temperatures this fall will not necessarily be the "new normal" for the north country and Adirondacks. But Cornell University climate researcher Arthur DeGaetano says the heavy rainfall and warm weather could be a glimpse into the future.

The report, released late last month by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, is based on the work of more than 50 scientists. It paints a harsh picture of extreme climate events - predicting that upstate New York will have heavier, and more frequent downpours, like those we've seen this year.

The report says the temperature in New York has already warmed 2.4 degrees in the past forty years. It projects a further rise of as much as three degrees by the 2020s, with the temperature steadily warming as much as nine degrees by the 2080s.

DeGaetano says that means northern New York would have a climate more like North Carolina or Georgia. He says the report isn't meant to scare people. It's meant to help them transition along with the climate. DeGaetano says agriculture will be one of the industries most affected. He spoke with Julie Grant.  Go to full article

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