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NCPR News Staff: Julie Grant

Reporter and Producer

Stories filed by Julie Grant

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NY mandates plastic bag recycling

Under a new state law, large stores and retail or grocery store chains in New York will have to provide collection bins for used carry out bags.
Lots of supermarkets encourage shoppers to carry re-usable bags. The new law goes further, to try to make sure those plastic bags still in use are recycled. Julie Grant reports.  Go to full article
Chef Ben Bebenroth and his crew plate mushroom dishes for their dinner guests.  (Photo by Julie Grant)
Chef Ben Bebenroth and his crew plate mushroom dishes for their dinner guests. (Photo by Julie Grant)

Chef takes diners into the woods

More and more people are thinking about where their food was grown. Local growers and farmer's markets are seeing the benefit of increased interest in buying locally. More chefs and restaurants are interested in local sources as well. One caterer from northeast Ohio is upping the ante. "Plated Landscapes" takes the restaurant to the woods...or the fields, creating gourmet events "in situ." Julie Grant reports the chef wants people to connect the dots between the environment and their food.  Go to full article

The buzz on bug sprays

As you head out on the trail or just into the backyard for this holiday weekend, the bug dope probably won't be far away. For decades, bug sprays with DEET have been the most effective to keep those disease-carrying pests away. But there are some new repellants on the market and even more to come. Julie Grant has the buzz on bug sprays.  Go to full article

Tomato ban hits hard on the farm

The Food and Drug Administration continues to investigate the source of tainted tomatoes that sickened more than 160 people. It's narrowing down the source of the salmonella bacteria, and has lifted a ban on tomato sales in many states. Julie Grant reports on how the ban has affected tomato growers.  Go to full article
Produce section of a supermarket in VA. (Photo by Ken Hammond, courtesy of USDA)
Produce section of a supermarket in VA. (Photo by Ken Hammond, courtesy of USDA)

A closer look at Chinese organics

More companies are importing organic products from China and other countries. But contaminated pet food, tainted toothpaste, and unauthorized antibiotics in fish have been imported to the U.S. from China. Now, some people are concerned about organic foods from China. Julie Grant reports.  Go to full article

What?s behind the organic milk label?

Organic used to be on the fringes of mainstream culture. Not any more. Ever since the National Organic Standards went into effect five years ago, organic foods have become big business. Sales of organic products now total about $20 billion a year in the US. But that quick growth spurt is coming with some growing pains. Julie Grant reports.  Go to full article

Corn ethanol: farmland conservation takes a back seat

Federal farmland conservation program have saved water, soil and wildlife through simple set-asides. That's when farmers get paid to take some cropland out of production. It protects waterways and provides wildlife habitat. It makes sense for the soil, too. But, in the second of our two-part series on ethanol, Julie Grant reports that as demand for corn and soybeans for ethanol production grows, farmland conservation is taking a back seat.  Go to full article

Educating children of migrant workers

More and more farm workers in the U.S. come from Mexico and Central America. Many farmers say they couldn't survive without them. Workers who come to North Country dairy farms usually leave their families behind, and plan to return home. A North Country dairy farm may employ a half dozen Mexican farmhands at a time. But crop farms depend on migrant workers, who travel with the planting and harvesting seasons. Migrant workers often move with their families, and the seasonal employment means the children are often uprooted. In our second story on the lives of migrant workers, Julie Grant reports on the challenges of educating children whose lives are dictated by the growing season.  Go to full article

Migrant workers - still harvest of shame?

More and more American farms are employing workers from Mexico and Central America. Even as far north and east as the North Country -- the number of Mexican and Central Americans working on dairy farms has risen dramatically. Industry leaders agree farms depend on reliable, plentiful Hispanic labor to survive.

A group of New York farmers is in the Veracruz area this week, hoping to learn more about traditional farming, local customs and life in their workers villages. Workers who come this far usually leave their families behind, and plan to return home.

A North Country dairy farm might employ a half dozen Mexican farmhands. But crop farming requires much more help, and the demand rises and falls with the planting and harvesting. During the growing season, nearly 300 workers and their children live in migrant camps around the K. W. Zellers family farm in rural northeast Ohio. Julie Grant spent some time at the Zellers' farm this fall.  Go to full article

Ten Threats: preserving wetlands

One of the biggest threats to the Great Lakes system is the loss of thousands of square miles of wetlands. From Lake Superior to the St. Lawrence River, some of the most important wildlife habitat along the edge of the waterway has been lost. For example, 200 years ago, much of the southern shore of Lake Erie was a huge swamp. Almost all of it has been drained and filled since European settlement. The GLRC's Julie Grant went to visit the last remaining bit, and the people who preserve it.  Go to full article

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