Skip Navigation
r e g i o n a l   n e w s
on:

NCPR is supported by:

This is a Visitor-Supported website.

NCPR News Staff: Natasha Haverty

Reporter and Producer

Natasha Haverty has an English degree from Brown University and got her radio training at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Maine.

From Maine she went to work at The Moth, a nonprofit in New York City devoted to the art of live storytelling, where she was the coordinator of the community outreach program that teaches workshops to schools and community centers and brings storytellers to the Moth stage (and the radio). She also helped produce the first two seasons of Peabody Award-winning Moth Radio Hour (now playing on NPR stations across the country).

Tasha returned to her home state after receiving the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities’ “Liberty and Justice for All” grant to create an oral history of the Norfolk Prison Debating Society, which had an outstanding record against top college teams in the Forties and Fifties. She recently premiered her original 'improvised audio drama' The Yankee City Series at a live listening event at Harvard University. Tasha arrived in the North Country on April Fool's Day, 2012. E-mail

Stories filed by Natasha Haverty

Show             
Algonquin Park Wolves. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/jdbsound/3968088234/">JDB Photos</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Algonquin Park Wolves. Photo: JDB Photos, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Howling for wolves

The Eastern Timber Wolf lived across the eastern United States before humans virtually erased it from the landscape. But in some parts of Canada, the Eastern Wolf is alive and well. And every August for the past fifty years, people from all around the world have made the journey to Algonquin Provincial Park in Ontario to hear its howl. Reporter Natasha Haverty sends this postcard.  Go to full article
George Prendes, outside the apartment he lived in before he went to prison, on 107th Street and Central Park West. Photo: Natasha Haverty
George Prendes, outside the apartment he lived in before he went to prison, on 107th Street and Central Park West. Photo: Natasha Haverty

Fifteen years behind bars under Rockefeller drug laws

Yesterday, the Prison Time Media Project took us 40 years back to the start of the war on drugs, and the controversial sentencing rules created by Governor Nelson Rockefeller. Those new laws sent tens of thousands of men and women to prison on long sentences for low-level drug crimes. George Prendes was one of those people.  Go to full article
Bedford Hills Correctional Facility. Photo by Amy Lindemuth
Bedford Hills Correctional Facility. Photo by Amy Lindemuth

In NYS prison, women hold on to motherhood

In New York state's prison nursery program, a woman can qualify to live with her newborn baby for up to one year.

But during the many hours when their mothers have to attend programs like GED classes or addiction counseling, or work in the garment shop, these babies have another group of inmates who look after them. Each of these inmate caregivers has to go through a long training to have this job. And the majority of them are mothers themselves.

This morning, our Prison Time Media Project continues, with a profile of one caregiver at Bedford Hills, New York's maximum-security prison for women.  Go to full article
Cassidy and Hermione. Cassidy says she has to work hard not to obsess about the day her daughter will leave. "You can't get sad about it yet, because everything that you feel they feel." Photo: Natasha Haverty
Cassidy and Hermione. Cassidy says she has to work hard not to obsess about the day her daughter will leave. "You can't get sad about it yet, because everything that you feel they feel." Photo: Natasha Haverty

When should babies stay with their moms in NY prisons?

The number of women in American prisons has gone up 800 percent over the last thirty years, according to the Federal Bureau of Justice. Most of these women are mothers. And about one in twenty of them are pregnant.

Here in New York State, a woman who gives birth while serving time has the chance to stay with her baby in a prison nursery, for up to one year, or eighteen months if the mother is eligible for parole by then.

A Department of Corrections study found that participating in prison nurseries lowers recidivism rates dramatically--cutting the chances of a woman coming back to prison in half.

Researchers say these programs also help the babies, giving them a chance to form secure attachments to their moms.

But in recent years, the numbers of mothers in the prison nurseries have gone down. In our latest installment of the Prison Time Media Project, reporter Natasha Haverty set out to learn why.  Go to full article
In New York state, the number of youth confined in public facilities decreased from 2,517 in 2001 to 1,005 in 2010, a 60 percent decline. Photo: Richard Ross, Juvenile-in-Justice Project
In New York state, the number of youth confined in public facilities decreased from 2,517 in 2001 to 1,005 in 2010, a 60 percent decline. Photo: Richard Ross, Juvenile-in-Justice Project

Study finds fewer NY, US children behind bars

A new study released this week finds that the US is putting fewer children behind bars. New York state has seen one of the sharpest drops.

In 2000 there were more than 2,800 kids being held in detention centers across New York. That number has dropped by nearly two-thirds -- and 13 youth detention centers have closed statewide.

Governor Andrew Cuomo has made closing those facilities one of his priorities: "You have juvenile justice facilities today where we have young people who are receiving help, assistance, program treatment that has already been proven to be ineffective."  Go to full article
An estimated 4 billion chestnut trees grew between Maine and Georgia, before they were wiped out by the blight, according to the American Chestnut Foundation. Today, they're estimated at fewer than 100 in their native range. Photo: Rajiv Narula
An estimated 4 billion chestnut trees grew between Maine and Georgia, before they were wiped out by the blight, according to the American Chestnut Foundation. Today, they're estimated at fewer than 100 in their native range. Photo: Rajiv Narula

Heard Up North: Bringing a tree back to life

In the beginning of last century, a blight wiped out almost all of the chestnut trees, and today you're almost as likely to come across a unicorn as you are a fully grown, productive American Chestnut Tree.

One of those "unicorns" is in North Russell, planted twenty-seven years ago by Todd and Nancy Alessi. In bloom, it looks right out of a Doctor Seuss book: with flowers, called catkins, like white pipe cleaners. Todd and Nancy invited reporter Natasha Haverty to their chestnut tree flowering party.  Go to full article
The day opened with drumming by the NAACP Albany Branch Student Theater Outreach Program (S.T.O.P.). Photo: Beehive Productions
The day opened with drumming by the NAACP Albany Branch Student Theater Outreach Program (S.T.O.P.). Photo: Beehive Productions

At John Brown Day, what does freedom mean?

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. In a few months, it will be exactly fifty years since the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where Martin Luther King, Jr., gave his "I Have a Dream" speech.

And this past weekend, one organization in the North Country held its annual birthday party for John Brown, on the Adirondack farm he lived in for two years, and the place where his body is buried.  Go to full article
Congressman Bill Owens hosted a group of security officials and business leaders at Clarkson University to discuss trade and travel across the US/Canada border. Photo: Natasha Haverty
Congressman Bill Owens hosted a group of security officials and business leaders at Clarkson University to discuss trade and travel across the US/Canada border. Photo: Natasha Haverty

Travel, job creation on table at Owens US/Canada border forum

In the aftermath of the September 11th attacks, crossing the border with Canada has become a much more difficult experience. Congressman Bill Owens hosted a group of security officials and business leaders at Clarkson University on Friday, April 5, to talk about how to move people and goods over the border securely, and create jobs.  Go to full article
"My association with being a felon is probably the same as most people's: You're dehumanized. There's a stamp on your forehead that says 'you're less than.'" Photo: Natasha Haverty
"My association with being a felon is probably the same as most people's: You're dehumanized. There's a stamp on your forehead that says 'you're less than.'" Photo: Natasha Haverty

Alternatives to Incarceration: Back in the world

Today, the final part in a series about society's efforts to turn away from long-term incarceration for nonviolent offenders. In Part one, we met Jeff, a college-bound young man from Western New York who fell into serious drug addiction, broke into a pharmacy, and cycled through drug courts and rehab for years before being sentenced to prison.

But instead of serving a four year sentence, Jeff went to Moriah Shock, a bootcamp-style, six-month program in the Adirondacks. We left off yesterday when Jeff was three months away from his release, and feeling confident his time in Shock would help him stay drug and crime-free when he returned home.

"I mean obviously I'm not going to walk around, I'm not going to march around and call cadence, but it helps establish certain discipline that's essential through the program, and this is from the heart, I'm not just speaking to build up the program because I know whatever I say is going to be fine."

In Part three, producer Natasha Haverty finds Jeff back in the world, rebuilding his life and looking ahead.  Go to full article
Lunchtime in the mess hall. Photo: Natasha Haverty
Lunchtime in the mess hall. Photo: Natasha Haverty

Alternatives to Incarceration: into Shock prison

This week as part of our Prison Time Media Project, producer Natasha Haverty is looking at some of the approaches cash-strapped states are taking to try and cut prison their populations.

Yesterday, we began the story of Jeff, a young man from western New York who fell into serious drug addiction and broke into a pharmacy to feed his habit. After spending years cycling through drug courts, unable to stay off drugs, he was sent to prison here in the North Country.

"It's very true to say that I as given a great opportunity at drug court and I failed. I failed at drug court. I failed. I'm going to prison, for years. That's the lowest of the low, that's the lowest I can think of before death."

But unlike many other inmates, Jeff was sent to a shock prison in Moriah, in Essex County, which focuses on life skills training and rehabilitation. Part two of our series takes us to Moriah Shock and finds Jeff at the middle of his prison sentence.  Go to full article

« first   « previous 10   48-57 of 89 stories   next 10 »   last »