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NCPR News Staff: Todd Moe

Morning Host and Producer
A native of rural Minnesota, Todd Moe grew up on a farm not far from mythical Lake Wobegon. He attended St. Olaf College in Northfield, MN; studied Speech/Theatre and Norwegian, and began his radio career as a student announcer at WCAL (2002 marks its 80th anniversary!).

Moe sings in the Potsdam Community Chorus, and hobbies include food, gardening, history and tango! He was a newscaster and reporter for Minnesota Public Radio for eight years. A favorite memory from that job was interviewing Norwegian actress Liv Ullmann. Moe and his partner, Paul Siskind, moved to the North Country in 1998. Siskind teaches at the Crane School of Music. E-mail

Stories filed by Todd Moe

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Swain swam the Hudson earlier this summer
Swain swam the Hudson earlier this summer

Swain Continues Lake Champlain Swim

A Vermont man swimming the length of Lake Champlain has made it past the half-way point. Christopher Swain began his 125-mile swim late last month in Whitehall, New York, and plans to finish in Quebec in a couple of weeks. The environmentalist says he was motivated by the high levels of E coli bacteria in the lake across the street from his Colchester home. He's been swimming six hours every day, has made stops along the way for community events and school visits, and expects to swim ashore in Burlington today. Swain swam down the Hudson River earlier this summer. He spoke with Todd Moe about his Lake Champlain trek so far.  Go to full article

Books: Tailspin - The Strange Case of Major Call

50 years ago this summer a gruesome murder case rocked the nation. Marilyn Sheppard, a housewife from an elite Cleveland suburb, was bludgeoned to death in her house during an apparent botched robbery attempt. A sensational murder trial ended with the conviction of Sheppard's husband, Dr. Sam Sheppard. Sheppard maintained his innocence, but even after his conviction was reversed in 1966, the question remains -- who really killed Marilyn Sheppard? For five years Bernard Conners, a novelist and former FBI field agent became engrossed in the case which inspired the 1960s TV series, "The Fugitive". In his latest book, Tailspin: The Strange Case of Major Call, Conners concludes that it was Major James Call who killed Sheppard. Call's criminal activities included the slaying of a Lake Placid police officer, and an exhaustive manhunt in the Adirondacks by New York State Police. Bernard Conners lives near Albany and has a summer home in Lake Placid. Todd Moe spoke with Conners about the book, which he believes cracks this decades-old case and vindicates Sheppard.  Go to full article
2004-2005 Einstein Fellows at the Einstein statue in Potomac Park
2004-2005 Einstein Fellows at the Einstein statue in Potomac Park

Canton Teacher Joins Einstein Fellowship in D.C.

A Canton high school chemistry teacher is spending the academic year helping to shape education policy in Washington D.C. Mickie Flores is among a dozen educators from across the country joining the Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellowship Program. The program, now in its tenth year, allows teachers to bring to Congress and the federal government their experiences from the classroom and offer real-life perspectives to policymakers on education. Flores will be working in the office of Illinois Senator Richard Durbin. She told Todd Moe more about her teaching career and what she hopes to accomplish this year.  Go to full article

Preview: Yeats Festival in Chestertown

Scholars, students and fans of Adirondack poet Jeanne Robert Foster will gather in Chestertown the weekend of September 9th for a conference. The Town of Chester Historical Society and the Yeats Society will host the Second International John Butler Yeats Festival: The Life of Jeanne Robert Foster. The event will focus on Jeanne Foster, her famous friends, her life in the Adirondacks and how that life influenced her poetry. Richard Londraville, who has a summer home in Colton, met Jeanne Foster in the mid-1960s. He's the co-author of Foster's biography and he told Todd Moe that she had a tremendous influence on his life.  Go to full article
Patricia Reiss Brooks
Patricia Reiss Brooks

Books: Mountain Shadows

Patricia Reiss Brooks' book, Mountain Shadows, is an adventure novel of courage, danger and love. Reiss is a native of Lake Placid and her book is set in the North Country during the wild days of Prohibition. It delves into rum running and efforts of the famous Troop B of New York State Troopers to curtail the activities. It also offers an intimate look into the emotional and physical stresses of a tuberculosis patient taking the cure in Saranac Lake. Todd Moe spoke with Patricia Brooks at the Hotel Saranac, and asked why she set the book in the Adirondacks during the 1920's.  Go to full article
Actors rehearse a scene from <i>Hippolytus</i> along the Raquette in Potsdam
Actors rehearse a scene from Hippolytus along the Raquette in Potsdam

Preview: Classic Greek Theater in Potsdam

You've heard of "Shakespeare in the Park" -- now a group of Potsdam actors is taking classic Greek theater outdoors. Performances of Euripides' Hippolytus will be given in Ives Park this Friday and Saturday night (6:30). Director Michael Emmitt, a drama major at SUNY-Potsdam, has created a new version of the mythical tale with eight local actors. Themes in the play include love, betrayal, revenge and forgiveness. Todd Moe talks with Emmitt about presenting this Greek tragedy along the Racquette River.  Go to full article
Swain, after a recent training swim in Lake Champlain
Swain, after a recent training swim in Lake Champlain

Vermont Man to Swim Lake Champlain

A Vermont man who recently finished an eight-week swim down the Hudson River plans to swim the length of Lake Champlain. Christopher Swain plans to start the 125-mile trip this morning in Whitehall, on the New York side of the lake, and finish in Quebec around September 24th. Swain, who lives in Colchester, says he was motivated by the high levels of E Coli bacteria in the lake across the street from his house.  Go to full article
Watson (second from right) and his team
Watson (second from right) and his team

Blind Outdoorsman Inspires Teamwork, Self-confidence

Despite losing his eyesight at age 12, Ross Watson has been an outdoor enthusiast most of his life. Watson has participated in the Para Olympics, and was the first blind climber to reach the top of Mount Logan, Canada's highest mountain. He lives in Alberta, where he's received numerous awards for his work on human rights issues. Watson spoke with Todd Moe prior to a speech to MBA students at Clarkson University in Potsdam last week.  Go to full article

Books: Breaking Trail

After digging through archives and articles, and recovering pieces of women's history, Peggy Lynn and Sandra Weber have joined together to present stories of remarkable Adirondack women. Their book, Breaking Trail, profiles 25 women, historical and contemporary, who've lived in or had experiences in the mountains. Singer-songwriter Peggy Lynn and writer-storyteller Sandra Weber told Todd Moe that these tales have remained unknown and unsung for too long.  Go to full article

Preview: East Branch Arts Festival

The 2nd annual East Branch Arts Festival begins today and runs through Saturday in Keene Valley. The festival is sponsored by the East Branch Friends of the Arts. The three day event features a series of hands-on workshops, performances, free demonstrations, lectures, tours and an art and media exhibit. Todd Moe talks with organizer Hilary Papineau.  Go to full article

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