Skip Navigation
r e g i o n a l   n e w s
on:

NCPR is supported by:

This is a Visitor-Supported website.

NCPR News Staff: The Environment Report

Stories filed by The Environment Report

Show             
Algae scooped out of Maumee Bay in Lake. Photo by Mark Brush / Michigan Radio
Algae scooped out of Maumee Bay in Lake. Photo by Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

Warmer waters fuel toxic algal blooms in the Great Lakes

Big, ugly algal blooms are reappearing in the western basin (and sometimes the central basin) of Lake Erie. The blooms happen when excess nutrients - mostly phosphorus - run off into the lake from farms and sewage treatment plants. Some of these kinds of algae produce toxins that are among the most powerful natural poisons on Earth.  Go to full article
Researchers pulling in a trawl net on the USGS <em>Muskie</em>. Photo by Jennifer Szweda Jordan
Researchers pulling in a trawl net on the USGS Muskie. Photo by Jennifer Szweda Jordan

Too warm for that perch dinner?

Yellow perch are a staple of firehouse and church fish fries, and the delicate fish was once plentiful in the Great Lakes.

But warmer lake waters in a changing climate threaten the yellow perch population -- as well as other popular cool water fish, like walleye.  Go to full article
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Professor John Janssen. Photo by Chuck Quirmbach.
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Professor John Janssen. Photo by Chuck Quirmbach.

Great Lakes fish on a diet

Scientists say one way climate change is harming the Great Lakes is by warming the water too quickly in the spring.

That can decrease food for tiny creatures in the lakes--the creatures that game fish like trout and salmon eat.

In the second part of our week-long series, In Warm Water, Chuck Quirmbach has more on what leaner meals for fish might mean for the people who like to catch them.  Go to full article
Herring fisherman and president of the North Shore Commercial Fishing Association, Steve Dahl, says the commercial fishing industry on Lake Superior is doing better than ever, but experts predict fish populations will shift due to warming waters. Photo by Doug Fairchild, courtesy of the Minnesota Sea Grant Institute
Herring fisherman and president of the North Shore Commercial Fishing Association, Steve Dahl, says the commercial fishing industry on Lake Superior is doing better than ever, but experts predict fish populations will shift due to warming waters. Photo by Doug Fairchild, courtesy of the Minnesota Sea Grant Institute

A chilly Lake Superior warms up

We kick off our week-long series In Warm Water: Fish and the Changing Great Lakes with a look at Lake Superior.

It has long been the coldest and most pristine Great Lake. Its frigid waters have helped defend it from some invasive species that have plagued the other Great Lakes. But Lake Superior's future could look radically different. Warming water and decreasing ice are threatening the habitat of some of the lake's most iconic fish.  Go to full article

Growing fruits and veggies in the city

For decades, people in cities have relied on farmers in rural areas to grow the fruits and vegetables we eat. But a new generation of farmers says there's no reason to keep agriculture out of the urban core. Ann Dornfeld reports.  Go to full article

Saving rainforests helps farmers

A new report says stopping deforestation in the rainforests will benefit farms in the U.S. Mark Brush reports, it calls for money to be set aside to pay for rainforest conservation.  Go to full article

New smokestack rules

This week, the U-S Environmental Protection Agency will release much-anticipated new rules limiting sulfur dioxide in the air. As Tanya Ott reports, it's almost certain to result in years of legal battles.  Go to full article
Jeremy Seifert produced the Dive!, a film about food waste and how much of it is actually useful. (Photo courtesy of Dive! The Film)
Jeremy Seifert produced the Dive!, a film about food waste and how much of it is actually useful. (Photo courtesy of Dive! The Film)

A filmmaker's food waste story

A film about food waste is catching attention and awards at independent film festivals across the country.

The film is called Dive!, and reviewers are shocked by the film's statistics about how much edible food that grocery stores toss into dumpsters. Shawn Allee reports the reviewers are also enthralled by the filmmaker's personal story about diving after that food.  Go to full article

Subsidies for solar power

Sources of renewable energy like wind, solar, and hydroelectric are still just tiny players in a world powered by fossil fuels. Most of the power for your light switch comes from burning coal and natural gas. Mark Brush reports the government is trying to change that. There are state and federal programs that will pay you to put solar panels on your house.  Go to full article

Hurricanes could complicate Gulf oil clean up

Hurricane season starts soon. Experts predict an active season with four "major" hurricanes. What happens if a storm hits while there's still an oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico? Tanya Ott reports.  Go to full article

1-10 of 803 stories   next 10 »   last »