Skip Navigation
r e g i o n a l   n e w s
on:

NCPR is supported by:

This is a Visitor-Supported website.

NCPR News Staff: Marie Cusick

Reporter, The Innovation Trail

Stories filed by Marie Cusick

Show             
At Monday's budget hearing, DEC Commissioner Joe Martens was grilled by legislators as a crowd of fracking opponents cheered and hissed. Photo: Matt Ryan for Innovation Trail
At Monday's budget hearing, DEC Commissioner Joe Martens was grilled by legislators as a crowd of fracking opponents cheered and hissed. Photo: Matt Ryan for Innovation Trail

DEC may miss fracking rules deadline

New York's Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Joe Martens suggested Monday that the state may miss a Feb. 27 deadline to complete its proposed fracking regulations. And that could stall a decision on gas drilling for months.

At a budget hearing Martens told legislators that there's no timetable for his agency's environmental review of fracking, known as the Supplemental Generic Environmental Impact Statement (SGEIS). He says the DEC is still waiting for the Department of Health to finalize its public health review.  Go to full article
New York City, like many large cities in the Northern Hemisphere, lies directly under important atmospheric circulations. Photo: Tony Fischer Photography / via Flickr
New York City, like many large cities in the Northern Hemisphere, lies directly under important atmospheric circulations. Photo: Tony Fischer Photography / via Flickr

How a distant city affects your local weather

Seesawing temperatures, melting snow and rain, heavy winds...and that's just the latest few days of weather extremes. New research may help explain why patterns are changing. It suggests that even if you live thousands of miles away from a major city, it could still be playing a role in your local weather.  Go to full article
Kaseem Moultrie on the steps of the capitol during the People's State of the State protest. Photo: Marie Cusick
Kaseem Moultrie on the steps of the capitol during the People's State of the State protest. Photo: Marie Cusick

Progressives present "people's" SOS message

A coalition of progressive groups got the jump on the governor's speech, holding their 23rd annual People's State of the State on the steps of the Capitol in Albany yesterday.  Go to full article
Governor Cuomo meets with New York's congressional delegation and county executives to discuss the financial impacts of Hurricane Sandy. Photo: Governor's office via <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/governorandrewcuomo/page2/">Flickr</a>
Governor Cuomo meets with New York's congressional delegation and county executives to discuss the financial impacts of Hurricane Sandy. Photo: Governor's office via Flickr

Cuomo to Congress: show me the money

UPDATE: The Associated Press reported late this morning that Congress had overwhelmingly approved $9.7 billion to pay flood insurance claims for the many home and business owners flooded out by Superstorm Sandy. The Senate was expected to pass the bill later today.

After facing intense pressure from both parties for failing to pass a $60 billion federal relief package for Sandy victims over the holidays, House Republicans now say they will vote on a $9 billion flood insurance program today, and the remaining balance on Jan. 15, 2013.

But New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says he still has doubts they'll follow through.  Go to full article
A researcher at Dr. Agris' lab at the University at Albany. Photo via <a href="http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTIwdYF6lqBRwalrx15_Qrg">New York NOW</a>
A researcher at Dr. Agris' lab at the University at Albany. Photo via New York NOW

SUNY Albany expands RNA research

Most of us know all about DNA, the genetic building blocks that make us unique. But in recent years, there's a lot of interest in RNA-- a molecule that controls how our genes are expressed.

It has implications for treating everything from cancer to Alzheimer's disease and millions of dollars in federal and state investment are going into RNA research at the University at Albany.  Go to full article
Weather data helped scientists predict the peak timing of flu outbreaks more than seven weeks before they happened. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/34728058@N08">US Army Corps of Engineers Europe District</a> via <a href=http://www.flickr.com/photos/34728058@N08>Flickr
Weather data helped scientists predict the peak timing of flu outbreaks more than seven weeks before they happened. Photo: US Army Corps of Engineers Europe District via Flickr

Researchers predict flu with weather forecasting techniques

Someday your local weatherman may also be able predict the latest flu outbreak.

That's according to a new study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.  Go to full article
Just 10 days after Hurricane Sandy, a Nor'easter dumped several inches of snow over much of the Northeast. But a new study indicates New York could be seeing a lot fewer cold blasts in the future. Photo (Sourland Mountain, NJ): <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/vilseskogen/">Vilseskogen</a>, CC <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
Just 10 days after Hurricane Sandy, a Nor'easter dumped several inches of snow over much of the Northeast. But a new study indicates New York could be seeing a lot fewer cold blasts in the future. Photo (Sourland Mountain, NJ): Vilseskogen, CC some rights reserved

Climate change may lead to much warmer NY

In the coming century will New York warm up by three degrees Fahrenheit and have a climate like Richmond, Virginia?

Or will it warm by eight degrees and become more like the state capital of Georgia, a city with the nickname "Hotlanta"?  Go to full article
New York City's East River viewed from Roosevelt Island, 2 p.m. on Monday, October 29. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/marklyon/">Mark Lyon</a>, CC <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
New York City's East River viewed from Roosevelt Island, 2 p.m. on Monday, October 29. Photo: Mark Lyon, CC some rights reserved

Hurricane Sandy: why don't some people heed weather warnings?

During Governor Cuomo's briefing on Hurricane Sandy Monday morning, he emphasized the need for people in evacuation areas to leave when they're advised to.

But, with memories of overblown predictions for Hurricane Irene's impact on the New York City area last year, some people still aren't taking the weather that seriously.  Go to full article
Drilling rig in the Marcellus Shale region. Photo: Laurie Barr
Drilling rig in the Marcellus Shale region. Photo: Laurie Barr

Fracking supporters, foes prepare legal next steps

New York State is poised to issue its plans for hydrofracking. The decision could come any time after Labor Day. But there's no guarantee the controversy will die down, and both opponents and supporters are exploring their legal options.  Go to full article
Russian graduate student Filipp Banfilov takes a test in his digital forensics course at UAlbany. Photo: Marie Cusick, Innovation Trail
Russian graduate student Filipp Banfilov takes a test in his digital forensics course at UAlbany. Photo: Marie Cusick, Innovation Trail

American and Russian students learn cyber security together in Albany

A bill to strengthen the nation's cyber security laws stalled in Congress last week, but the issue remains a top priority for policy makers and business leaders around the globe.

The Innovation Trail's Marie Cusick reports on a new program at SUNY Albany that connects students in New York and Russia to teach them about cyber security.  Go to full article

1-10 of 13 stories   next 3 »   last »