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NCPR News Staff: David Chanatry

Reporter, New York Reporting Project at Utica College

Stories filed by David Chanatry

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Different visions of the future competing outside the Schulyer County courthouse. Photo: David Chanatry
Different visions of the future competing outside the Schulyer County courthouse. Photo: David Chanatry

Protesters rally against plans for gas storage under Seneca Lake

The debate over proposals to store natural gas, propane and butane in salt caverns under Seneca Lake has become increasingly vocal, especially after a federal agency approved part of the project last May.

Last week opponents organized the biggest rally yet in the Finger Lakes village of Watkins Glen.  Go to full article
Cooking heroin. Experts say the drug is cheap and easy to find in the North Country. Photo: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Heroin.JPG">Psychonaught</a>, public domain
Cooking heroin. Experts say the drug is cheap and easy to find in the North Country. Photo: Psychonaught, public domain

Drug courts offer rehab alternative as heroin abuse surges

As the use of heroin surges, many people arrested for drug-related crimes are ending up in drug court. It's one of the so-called 'problem solving courts' that have emerged in recent years. And they rely on the discrimination and skill of a judge.  Go to full article
Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/danielleellis55/13295727434/in/photolist-mfU5xU-mfS6bc-cenaT-Jyndv-4PsCEL-4KNJ9Q-65SpkG-5DbZz4-aDrE9x-aqV1pK-5SviVC-5xG6CF-gpwP73-j2iq6X-65G8XH-jFr6Gt-jFrmQz-jFrE2D-jFsgDv-jFsrcr-jFstic-jFsKi8-jFsKUM-jFsNXk-jFt4zt-jFtoD8-jFtp3W-jFtsqN-jFtvXg-jFtEgG-jFtHrE-jFtW9o-jFtYZJ-jFuhsb-jFunvA-jFuxkq-jFuRzw-jFvoAj-jFvV33-jFso6B-jFsPje-jFsRtp-jFsZkX-jFu469-jFu6w1-jFujoU-jFuAbW-jFv1au-jFvbsy-jFvoMJ">Danielle Sprags</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Photo: Danielle Sprags, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Cheap, easy, deadly: heroin use rising in rural NYS

Early this month, the Food and Drug Administration approved a prescription device that can inject a fast acting antidote to heroin and other opioid drugs. It's the latest response to a surge in opioid abuse.

Heroin use has doubled between 2007 and 2012. It's no longer just an urban street drug--it's now common in small town America.  Go to full article
West Side United Methodist Church in Syracuse is on the auction block. Photo: David Chanatry
West Side United Methodist Church in Syracuse is on the auction block. Photo: David Chanatry

After 140 years, a church closes its doors

This a bittersweet story, especially coming just as the Christmas draws near.

Another church has gone silent.

The West Side United Methodist Church in Syracuse has closed its doors, and last week the contents went to auction.  Go to full article
Casino gaming sites in New York. Photo: NY Governor's Office
Casino gaming sites in New York. Photo: NY Governor's Office

Casinos: how did we get here from Las Vegas?

If voters pass the proposed amendment to the state constitution to allow casino gambling today, New York will become the 21tst state to legalize commercial, Las Vegas style casinos.

Across much of the country nowadays, gambling seems like the natural state of things. But it wasn't always that way, as we hear from David Chanatry, with the New York Reporting Project at Utica College.  Go to full article
"King of the eastern forest," an American chestnut in central Maryland in 1914. Photo: US Forestry Service
"King of the eastern forest," an American chestnut in central Maryland in 1914. Photo: US Forestry Service

Bio-engineering the return of the American chestnut

The American chestnut tree was once known as the "king-of the eastern forest." It tree grew more than 100 feet tall and 6 feet across, and accounted for a quarter of the timber in the woods. Its straight-grained wood was remarkably resistant to rot, and its nuts were a reliable source of food.

The chestnut was wiped out by blight in the early 20th century, but now scientists in Syracuse think they're close to bringing it back. Our story comes from David Chanatry with the New York Reporting Project at Utica College.  Go to full article
The U.S. Salt plant, owned by Inergy. Salt is currently mined here, and the caverns from previous mining are where Inergy wants to store gas and LPG's (propane and butane.) Photo: David Chanatry
The U.S. Salt plant, owned by Inergy. Salt is currently mined here, and the caverns from previous mining are where Inergy wants to store gas and LPG's (propane and butane.) Photo: David Chanatry

Are the Finger Lakes the place to store natural gas?

It's something few people think about, but all the natural gas and other fossil fuels being produced by hydrofracking have to be stored somewhere before they get to the consumer. Often used for the job: underground salt caverns like the ones near Watkins Glen in the Finger Lakes.

Now an out-of-state company wants to expand storage there, a plan some local residents call risky.  Go to full article
Protestors at an Albany anti-fracking demonstration in August, 2012. Photo: Brian Mann
Protestors at an Albany anti-fracking demonstration in August, 2012. Photo: Brian Mann

Fracking fuels grassroots activisim

In the five years since New Yorkers first began to hear about horizontal hydrofracking, the state has become a battleground over the gas drilling technique.
While opponents have some high profile support, their movement remains mostly a loose collection of small groups that have been remarkably effective.  Go to full article

Why is fear up when crime is down in America?

In the wake of the Newtown tragedy and the contentious push for new gun laws in both Washington and Albany, it's often easy to forget that we've been experiencing a major decline in crime in America.  Go to full article
Atlantic Salmon fingerlings hit the water in the Salmon River. Photo: David Chanatry
Atlantic Salmon fingerlings hit the water in the Salmon River. Photo: David Chanatry

Bringing back the Salmon River's salmon

In recent years both the federal and New York State governments have been studying how best to re-introduce salmon to New York's Salmon River.

That might come as a surprise to anyone who's ever caught one of the river's famous eye-popping sized fish.  Go to full article

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