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Carbon capture technology is being tested for the first time in the country at a coal-burning power plant near Milwaukee. If it works, it could be added to existing power plants, or incorporated into new ones. (Photo by Erin Toner)
Carbon capture technology is being tested for the first time in the country at a coal-burning power plant near Milwaukee. If it works, it could be added to existing power plants, or incorporated into new ones. (Photo by Erin Toner)

Coal plants test CO2 capture

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There was broad praise this week for a record agreement requiring American Electric Power to spend $4.6 billion to reduce emissions at its Midwest power plants that causes acid rain in the Northeast. The Ohio-based power company agreed to reduce emissions by at least 69% over the next 10 years. After stricter rules and enforcement under the Clean Air Act, coal-burning power plants have done much to reduce the pollution that leaves their smokestacks. But the industry is not controlling the main greenhouse gas - carbon dioxide. That could change in the next decade. One utility is about to begin the first test ever of technology to reduce CO2 emissions at power plants. If all goes well, an American Electric Power plant will be the first to use it. Erin Toner reports.

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