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The status of the smart grid

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Your power bill likely will change in the next few years. Lester Graham reports there's a good chance you'll be thinking about how much electricity you use and when you'll use it.

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Transcript: Lester Graham, November 17, 2009

Your power bill likely will change in the next few years. Lester Graham reports there's a good chance you'll be thinking about how much electricity you use and when you'll use it:

The Smart Grid will mean changes. Electric companies we'll be able to monitor power use better and deliver electricity more efficiently. That should help avoid brown outs and black outs.

But it'll also be tell you in real time how much power you're using.

Brian Seal is with the non-profit Electric Power Research Institute. He says, eventually, you'll be charged different rates at different times of the day. "Consumers would be aware of that so that they can program their appliances and other equipment to consume energy when the price is low rather than when it's high."

But you'll need Smart Appliances to work with a Smart Grid. GE is the first to announce a product line - right as the government released $3.4 billion in grants to power companies for the Smart Grid.

For The Environment Report, I'm Lester Graham.

Copyright 2009. The Regents of the University Of Michigan. Used with permission.

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