Skip Navigation
Regional News
The honeymoon between Andrew Cuomo and the voters of this state continues. Down a little bit from last month, but only a little bit.

Poll finds Cuomo and his policies still very popular--for now

Listen to this story
A new poll finds the honeymoon continues for Governor Andrew Cuomo, and that voters agree with the governor's crusade for a property tax cap and ethics reform. Karen DeWitt reports.

Hear this

Download audio

Share this


Explore this

Reported by

Karen DeWitt
NYS Capitol Correspondent

Tags

Steve Greenberg, with Siena College, says Cuomo is still enjoying near record high popularity, with a 71% -22% favorable rating. He says voters support the governor’s focus in getting a property tax cap and ethics reform passed in the legislature.

“The honeymoon between Andrew Cuomo and the voters of this state continues,” said Greenberg. “Down a little bit from last month, but only a little bit.”

In April, 73% viewed the governor favorably, 18% held a negative view.

The only risk for Cuomo, says Greenberg, is that lawmakers don’t adopt his programs by the end of the session next month.  Cuomo’s other top priority is allowing gay marriage, that came in fourth for those surveyed, after reforming New york City’s rent laws. In New York City, rent regulation reform was the number one priority, in Upstate and the New York City suburbs, it was property taxes.

Cuomo runs a risk, says Greenberg, if lawmakers don’t adopt his programs by the end of the session next month. 

“If he hits a grand slam and is successful on all four of those issues, I would anticipate if his rating go even higher,” said Greenberg, who says if Cuomo “strikes out”, his rankings will drop “precipitously”.

Cuomo seems well aware of that and has said he considers the final scheduled day of session, June 20th as “D-Day”.

Greenberg says the poll finds that legislators would be punished, too, by voters if they don’t come through. More than half say if their Senator or Assemblymember does not approve an ethics package, they will be less likely to vote for their representative in 2012.

“There was always this sense that ethics, people support it but don’t really care about it, it’s a second tier or third tier issue,” said Greenberg. “That’s not true anymore.”

One more warning sign for lawmakers- the number of voters who think the state is headed in the wrong direction, is growing.  Only 40% of voters say New York is headed on the right track, compared to 46% in April.

Visitor comments

on:

NCPR is supported by:

This is a Visitor-Supported website.