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Same-sex marriage now the law, Cuomo says, even if some officials don't like it

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Governor Cuomo says he "understands" the point of view of opponents of gay marriage who plan to protest during New York's first same sex marriages later this month. But he says public officials who refuse to okay the ceremonies are likely not going to be able to stay in their jobs.

Martha Foley has more.

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Karen DeWitt
NYS Capitol Correspondent

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Governor Cuomo says he “understands” opponents of same sex marriage who plan to protest during New York’s first same gay marriages later this month, but he says public officials who refuse to okay the ceremonies are likely not going to be able to stay in their jobs.

 

A town clerk near Binghamton says she's resigning.

 

Laura Fotusky submitted a letter of resignation to the town board in Barker Monday. She says her religious beliefs prevent her from signing a marriage certificate for a gay couple, as she'd be required to do as a municipal clerk.

 

Cuomo says public officials are expected to uphold the law, “If you’re saying you’re going to act through your religious beliefs rather than the law of the state, then you can’t operate in a position where you’re supposed to be enforcing the laws.”

 

Fotusky’s letter was published on the website of the Christian lobbying group New Yorkers for Constitutional Freedoms.

 

The 56-year-old Republican has been town clerk in Barker since 2007. She says she'll step down on July 21, three days before New York's law allowing same-sex marriage takes effect.

 

Volney Town Clerk Barbara MacEwen told local media outlets last month she opposed gay marriage on religious grounds but would follow the law.

 

Cuomo was asked about planned protests of same sex marriages when they begin in New York on July 24th.

 

He says he understands the opposition’s point of view, and their religious position, but says he’s “comfortable” with the new gay marriage law, and believes it’s a matter of  “equality and anti discrimination”. 

 

 

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