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George Maragos campaigning at an NYC street fair. Photo: Maragos campaign
George Maragos campaigning at an NYC street fair. Photo: Maragos campaign

Gillibrand foe George Maragos says he'll spend own money to gain senate seat

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The front-running Republican challenging US Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand admits he faces an "uphill battle" against the Democratic incumbent.

George Maragos - a former banker and now Nassau County Comptroller -- says he'll spend his own money to try to level the field. Martha Foley has more.

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Reported by

Karen DeWitt
NYS Capitol Correspondent

George Maragos has secured the 25% of delegate support he’ll need to be placed automatically on the republican primary ballot for the Senate seat, he says he expects more endorsements from county leaders in the coming days before the GOP convention March 16. 

Maragos  is pro-life and personally against gay marriage, though he says he respects New York’s same sex marriage law. But he says he’d rather focus on improving the economy, and says too much attention has been paid to social issues in the GOP Presidential campaign lately .  

“The crises that we’re facing in our country are not the social issues, they’re the economic issues,” said Maragos. “We’re losing sight of that.”

Maragos says he needs $15 million dollars to run a credible campaign, and is willing to spend several million of his own fortune to do it.  He’s facing potential primary challenges from Rye Town Supervisor Joe Carvin and New York City Attorney Wendy Long. Maragos has secured enough delegate  support to win an automatic spot on the Republican primary ballot for the Senate seat.And he says he expects more endorsements from county leaders as the March 16th   date of the  GOP convention approaches.

Maragos is pro life and personally against gay marriage, though he says he respects New York’s same sex marriage law.

He says he’d rather focus on improving the economy. The GOP Presidential campaign has paid too much attention to social issues, he said, “The crises that we’re facing in our country are not the social issues, they’re the economic issues. We’re losing sight of that.”

 Maragos says he needs $15 million dollars to run a credible campaign, and is willing to spend several million of his own fortune to do it.  He’s facing potential primary challenges from Rye Town Supervisor Joe Carvin and New York City Attorney Wendy Long.

 

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