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The view through one of the St. lawrence University telescopes last evening.  Venus is the little black dot. Photo: Melissa Burchard.
The view through one of the St. lawrence University telescopes last evening. Venus is the little black dot. Photo: Melissa Burchard.

Earthlings watch the Venus Transit

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Yesterday evening Venus made its last journey across the face of the sun, as seen from Earth, until the year 2117. People of all ages covered the southeast corner of the St. Lawrence University practice fields to get their look at earth's closest neighboring planet, peering through one of the big telescopes or a pair of safe solar glasses.

Tasha Haverty joined the crowd, and talked to physics professor Jeff Miller, as well as Lillian LePage and her son Wally, Chip Jenkins and Tucker Catanzaro for today's Heard Up North.

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Natasha Haverty
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The viewing of last night’s Venus transit was well-attended by enthusiastic community members. St. Lawrence University physics professor Jeff Miller told viewers to look for a missing piece around the top corner of the sun. Children in attendance described Venus as being “as big as a speck of dust,” and were excited to see it cross over the sun.

 “Well, I think I saw Venus, I think I did,” said 94-year-old Lillian LePage, who explained that she first became interested in the planets as a child reading paper books about the solar systems. “I dream a lot about what’s going to happen in the future, and so that’s why if you watch them, you can almost figure out whether you’re right or wrong.” LePage was accompanied by her son, Wally.

 “I never had seen anything like this. I didn’t know how it moved or what it would look like or how you did it,” said Chip Jenkins. “I was also surprised at how many people were showing up. People are really excited about it.” Jenkins added that the transit itself was very interesting to watch.

Tucker Catanzaro initially found out about the Venus transit by reading the newspaper, and was encouraged by his science teacher to attend the event. “In the 1700s when they first found this out, they thought that everything revolved around us, the earth, and then they started looking at this and thinking, ‘Hey, it doesn’t! It’s revolving around the sun,’” said Catanzaro.

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