Skip Navigation
Regional News
Where drillers want to use hydrofracking in New York. Pending well permit applications for high-volume hydraulic fracturing. Source: Innovation Trail & NYS DEC
Where drillers want to use hydrofracking in New York. Pending well permit applications for high-volume hydraulic fracturing. Source: Innovation Trail & NYS DEC

No rush for DEC fracking rules

Listen to this story
In the latest salvo in local battles over gas drilling, a company says it's shutting down wells and stopping free gas to landowners in a western New York town that passed a moratorium on drilling late last month.

Communities across the state are waiting for proposed hydro fracking regulations now being drafted by the Department of Environmental Conservation. There have been indications that Gov. Andrew Cuomo would allow limited hydraulic fracturing in some southern tier communities. Yesterday, the governor told New York Public Radio the first step is thorough rule-making.

Hear this

Download audio

Share this


Explore this

The town of Avon, 20 miles southwest of Rochester, passed a one-year moratorium on gas drilling and hydraulic fracturing on June 28th. Lenape Resources has already drilled about 25 wells in Avon without using technology subject to new state regulations.

There have been reports for some time now that Governor Cuomo would soon begin to allow limited hydraulic fracturing in some Southern Tier in communities. In an interview with New York public radio yesterday, Cuomo says that before giving the green light, states must consider home rule.

"I have not pushed the DEC to expedite any decision," said Cuomo. "I want a timely decision, but I want a thorough decision. And they have thousands of comments, as you know, and they're working their way through the comments. I know they're working very hard, but I want them to do it on a professional timetable and not a political timetable."

Cuomo says the first step is for the Department of Environmental Conservation to release a set of recommendations for fracking in New York.

Meanwhile, research released today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences finds that fluids released during fracking in Pennsylvania are likely seeping upward thousands of feet into drinking water supplies. The study was conducted by scientists at Duke University and California State Polytechnic. It tested drinking water wells and aquifers across Northeastern Pennsylvania.

Visitor comments

on:

NCPR is supported by:

This is a Visitor-Supported website.