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Matt Murray, (center, red T-shirt) brought more than 60 veterans of the U.S. Armed Forces and their family members to Lake Placid for a tour of the area's Olympic venues. Photo: Chris Morris, courtesy Adirondack Daily EnterpriseEnterprise
Matt Murray, (center, red T-shirt) brought more than 60 veterans of the U.S. Armed Forces and their family members to Lake Placid for a tour of the area's Olympic venues. Photo: Chris Morris, courtesy Adirondack Daily EnterpriseEnterprise

Boy Scout leads Lake Placid Olympic tour

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A 16-year-old from the Troy area helped bring a group of more than 60 people, including Armed Services veterans and their families, to Lake Placid last week to tour Olympic sites and dine at the local American Legion hall.

Matt Murray, of Brunswick, is a junior at Tamarac High School and a member of Boy Scouts of America Troop 537. The Lake Placid trip was part of his Eagle Scout project, which he hopes to complete soon. Chris Morris caught up with the group and has our story.

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Chris Morris
Tri-Lakes Correspondent

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Murray brought a bus of veterans and their teenage kids up to the Lake Placid area.“ I basically fundraised and allowed them for a day to just enjoy all of the things Lake Placid has to offer,” he said.

The day started with bobsled rides and biathlon target shooting at the Olympic Sports Complex. From there, Murray brought the group to the Olympic Jumping Complex, where they took rides to the top of the ski jumps, ate lunch and viewed the weekly freestyle show. Next up were gondola rides on Whiteface Mountain, tours of the Olympic Museum and shopping in downtown Lake Placid. The day wrapped up with a dinner at the American Legion hall.

Alan Matheson, of Melrose, was a construction mechanic with the U.S. Navy and served in Iraq in 2005. Speaking at the base of the 90- and 120-meter ski jumps, he was all smiles. “It’s wonderful: The kid is incredible,” Matheson said. “What he’s doing is wonderful. We’re having a wonderful time. I’m hoping to get back and ride the bobsled, I’m going to ride the gondola, and just enjoy this beautiful day, ya know?”

Murray began planning his Eagle Scout project about two years ago when he volunteered at a barbecue organized by Patriot Hills of New York. “It’s a big issue: our veterans, and helping them reintegrate and making them feel comfortable when they get back from serving overseas,” he said. “So this is my way of helping that cause; it’s something that more should be done about, and this is me trying to kick-start a bigger movement to help our veterans out when they get back.”

Jeannine Mannarino is president, CEO and founder of Patriot Hills of New York, a Schenectady-based veterans rehabilitation and reintegration organization. She says Murray, the youngest of her nearly 50 volunteers, has taken a strong interest in helping service members as they return from combat. “He recognized at that very young age of 14 that we all have to pull together as a nation to help our veterans,” Mannarino said.

Murray had to raise about $5,000 for the trip to Lake Placid. To reach that goal, he held a pancake breakfast at the Center Brunswick Volunteer Fire Company, raffled three flags from Gettysburgh Flag Works and hosted a bowl-athon at Uncle Sam Lanes. He also wrote to local politicians, business people and civic leaders, asking them to sponsor a soldier for the trip.

Murray says the project has been a resounding success. “It’s hard to put into words how I feel right now,” he said. “It’s been two years. I talked to the combat vets, I talked to the Patriot Riders group — we were rolling into Lake Placid with 30 bikes as an escort. We had a sheriff in front to hold off side streets so we could get in through intersections easier. The general mood of the participants — they’re all happy, they’re all enjoying themselves. That’s what this is about: Letting them create good, new memories, quality memories, for them to have forever.”

Murray’s father, Larry, is charter organization representative for Matt’s Boy Scout troop. The pride for his son’s work was clear as he spoke about the project.

 “So here we are today and everybody is enjoying themselves, they’re just having a very nice time, enjoying the facilities at ORDA, and it’s special,” Larry said. “It’s my son, so it’s really hard for me to talk about him. I’m just proud as punch, his mom is proud as punch and I’m just honored to be in his company. He’s a good man and a good friend.”

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