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The Magnolia Warbler, one of the species of birds on the decline in the Adirondack region. Photo: Audubon Society
The Magnolia Warbler, one of the species of birds on the decline in the Adirondack region. Photo: Audubon Society

Heard Up North: Lecture hall becomes a wild forest

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Last night veteran journalist Bill Blakemore gave the keynote presentation at St. Lawrence University's Climate Change Forum. That talk has been publicized all over the North Country, and Blakemore appeared on NCPR Thursday, so you may have known about that already. But chances are, you didn't know about the surprise flash mob.

Earlier in the semester, the organizing committee for the Forum asked St. Lawrence art professor Peter Nelson to come up with an installation related to the theme of climate change. But as Nelson was coming up with an idea, it dawned on him that the materials and energy needed to create a typical installation would be wasteful, and go against the whole spirit of the event. So instead, he came up with a way to transform Eben Holden Hall into a forest grove, using only the human voice.

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Natasha Haverty
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Tzintzun Aguilar and Michelle Goldberg were part of a group of students that surprised the audience at St. Lawrence University’s climate change forum last night with a chorus of birdsong. All of the birds represented are considered threatened, and are native to the Adirondack region. They included the Olive-sided Flycatcher, the Magnolia Warbler, and the American Crow.

You can listen to the entire two minute performance here.

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