Skip Navigation
Regional News
A Canadian power line crew from K-Line Construction in New Brunswick gets pre-storm instructions from National Grid officials at a temporary staging area in Saranac Lake.  In anticipation of Hurricane Sandy, the crew was diverted to the Adirondacks by National Grid while en-route to their original destination in Massachusetts.<br />Photo: Mark Kurtz
A Canadian power line crew from K-Line Construction in New Brunswick gets pre-storm instructions from National Grid officials at a temporary staging area in Saranac Lake. In anticipation of Hurricane Sandy, the crew was diverted to the Adirondacks by National Grid while en-route to their original destination in Massachusetts.
Photo: Mark Kurtz

Hurricane Sandy: After all the prep, what's the damage?

Listen to this story
As of Tuesday morning, National Grid was reporting more than 18,000 customers without power in the North Country and central New York region, most of those in Schenectady, Syracuse, and Oswego. A few customers were without power in Potsdam, and about 250 were without power in Watertown and the Clayton area.

Brian Mann was on the road Tuesday morning scanning for storm damage. He left home at 4 a.m and headed toward Lake George. He was in Bolton landing when he spoke with Martha Foley.

Hear this

Download audio

Share this


Explore this

Story location

News near this location

***

Well, the good news really is that this is a dodged bullet for us. I think this is almost the exact opposite of Irene, where we got the big hit and New York City was spared, and this time obviously New York City has been hammered.

For the moment at least, the storm has not done significant damage to the North Country. I’ve seen some downed trees; I’ve seen some squalls of wind and rain as I’ve driven through. There were reports of spotty power outages, but by and large, you know, not a huge frightening impact to our region.

So you headed down to Lake George early, early this morning, there were some alarming images of Lake George last night.

That’s right, videos circulating on Facebook and other places showing this big wind kind of pushing the swell and the surge down towards the southern end of the lake around Lake George Village. And some I talked to there say it was dramatic, there were gusting winds and a big chop.

But it only kind of surged a little bit of water up onto land, no damage to structures that I could see. And also talking to officials down here, there are no reports of injuries; people were off the water. And so some dramatic images, but here again, you know, no significant impact.

What about the drive and other transportation issues? …Are the trains still running for example, the Amtrak trains down there?

Amtrak is shut down again today, and so the run from Albany up to Montreal won’t be operating. Also, Cape Air and PenAir who operate out of Plattsburgh and Saranac Lake, or the Lake Clear airport will be offline again today. And throughout the region really with most of the Eastern Seaboard flights tangled, because of JFK and airports in New Jersey. People should call ahead and make sure that any kind of transportation plans they have are still in place.

And I would say still in the North Country, if you’re out driving around just do be alert for downed trees and for crews working. Most of the region's spared, but there could easily be spotty places, where little micro burst knock stuff loose, so people should be aware of that.

You know Brian, here in Canton when I drove in this morning, the parking lot of the Dunkin’ Donuts across the street was just jammed with idling utility trucks, cherry pickers. You know obviously on the ready. It seemed like everybody made a major push to get ready for this.

I think that’s right. I think Irene was sort of a taste of what could happen, and of course the ice storm another a big example of what can go wrong in these situations. And when the Governor visited Ausable Forks over the weekend, he made it clear that he wanted resources kind of forward positioned. He activated the National Guard early and made sure they were ready to go. And so this may in hindsight be seen as kind of a fire drill, sort of a practice run, and it will be interesting to see what everyone finds in terms of the communication, and that sort of thing. But, it does seem to me so far, it looks fairly successful in terms of people being ready.

I think it would have been significant if we had been hit hard at the same time that New York City was hit hard. We might have been very much on our own for a week or 10 days, while most resources went Downstate. And so having those resources in place would have been very much to our advantage. So, again kind of a fire drill here, and probably a good one.

 

 


Visitor comments

on:

NCPR is supported by:

This is a Visitor-Supported website.