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Janet Duprey talking with her Plattsburgh district office administrative assistant Cathy Kourofsky and her husband Brian at the Duprey campaign headquarters in Plattsburgh. Photo: Mark Kurtz
Janet Duprey talking with her Plattsburgh district office administrative assistant Cathy Kourofsky and her husband Brian at the Duprey campaign headquarters in Plattsburgh. Photo: Mark Kurtz

Duprey wins 115th Assembly seat

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Republican Janet Duprey swept the 115th Assembly race last night, beating back Conservative challenger Karen Bisso and Democrat Tim Carpenter. She won 52 percent of the vote.

The incumbent Republican will return to Albany next year, representing Clinton, Franklin, and part of St. Lawrence counties. While last night's victory was decisive, the campaign wasn't easy.

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Reported by

Sarah Harris
Reporter and Producer

It’s been a tough haul for Janet Duprey this election season.

Her bi-partisan politics, as well as her support for gay marriage and reproductive rights, drew fire from critics.

She faced stiff competition in the Republican primary from Karen Bisso, who then stayed in the race as a Conservative party candidate. 

In September, one of her campaign signs along Route 11 was spray pained with the words ‘baby killer.’

"The defacing of the signs was hateful and it really rattled me," Duprey said. "I think I’m pretty tough – I’ve been in this business 37 years and I’d never had anything hit me like that."

So it was with nervous anticipation that that Duprey again squared off against Bisso and Democratic challenger Tim Carpenter in the three-way general election.

Bisso ran an extremely active campaign, attacking Duprey’s moderate politics.  

"People said I was a third party candidate – I really felt like I was the only Republican in the race," Bisso said. 

Democrat Tim Carpenter acknowledged in an interview yestreday afternoon that his campaign could have been more aggressive and a three-way race against an incumbent meant his votes might be split.

"If I were a betting man I might bet on the incumbent," Carpenter said, "because the incumbent almost always wins."

Last night Duprey gained an early lead. The first numbers reported were from her home town of Peru.

"My home town did really well for me. I did better than 2-to-1. Which is nice. It’s a nice way to start the evening," Duprey said with a smile. 

And the votes kept climbing, culminating in a decisive win. Duprey says that means that North Country voters know what they want.

"I think the message is that the North Country is a group of compassionate people. They’re accepting. I certainly know there are people who don’t agree with all of my votes – my marriage equality vote, my continuous support for women’s rights, and that’s fine. But we can disagree and be respectful."

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