Skip Navigation
Regional News
Map of New York showing Adirondack Park bounded by traditional Blue Line. Photo: Wikimedia Commons
Map of New York showing Adirondack Park bounded by traditional Blue Line. Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Where the heck is the Adirondacks?

Listen to this story
Over the last several years, we here at North Country Public Radio have been asking questions about the way our region is marketed to tourists.

We've interviewed some of the top tourism entrepreneurs and marketing experts, from places like the Thousand Islands, the Tug Hill and the Adirondacks.

We've poked at the question of whether northern New York's incredible natural beauty is being marketed as effectively as other tourist destinations.

Hear this

Download audio

Share this


Explore this

Reported by

Brian Mann
Adirondack Bureau Chief

Story location

News near this location

Well, here's the good news: There's a lot of growth potential.
Most people agree that places like Vermont and Napa Valley have done a better job branding themselves to potential visitors.

Some have also questioned whether that kind of regional branding effort is necessary — or even a good idea.

One of the people who's taken part in that conversation is Clyde Rabideau, mayor of the village of Saranac Lake.

Saranac Lake Mayor Clyde Rabideau with son Kasey (left) and daughter Randi (right).  (Photos:  Clyde Rabideau)
Saranac Lake Mayor Clyde Rabideau with son Kasey (left) and daughter Randi (right). (Photos: Clyde Rabideau)
After reading an essay on NCPR's "In Box" news blog, Rabideau decided to borrow one of our audio recorders so that he could do some research of his own.

With his son Kasey and daughter Randi, Rabideau interviewed people on Long Island, to find out how much they knew about the Adirondack Park.  The answer? 

They didn't know very much.

Mayor Rabideau spoke about his experiment with NCPR's Adirondack bureau chief Brian Mann.

Visitor comments

on:

NCPR is supported by:

This is a Visitor-Supported website.