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Kristina Diseth lives in Oslo, Norway, and has been a summer volunteer at Pendragon Theatre in Saranac for the last two seasons.  Photo:  Todd Moe
Kristina Diseth lives in Oslo, Norway, and has been a summer volunteer at Pendragon Theatre in Saranac for the last two seasons. Photo: Todd Moe

A Nordic connection at Pendragon Theatre

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The 1980 Winter Olympics brought a lot of international visitors to the Adirondacks. Kristina Diseth, of Norway, worked as an office clerk at the Lake Placid Resort Hotel during the games.

Diseth made friends that year, and for the last couple of summers, she's been back in the Adirondacks as a volunteer at Pendragon Theatre in Saranac Lake. She's helped out with summer productions -- working with directors, in the costume shop and even sweeping the stage after performances. Diseth retired recently from a college theater career in Norway, and a chance to re-connect with old friends lured her back to the North Country.

Todd Moe caught up with her during a break in her duties to talk about a love of theater and leaving one mountainous region to visit another. That's today's "Heard Up North."

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Todd Moe
Morning Host and Producer

During her eight-week stint at Pendragon this summer, Kristina worked as stage manager for the show "Doubt." In the past, she has organized costumes for the costume manager and has performed other small tasks around the theatre. She takes responsibility for making the house look good. She calls herself, “this little theatre cleaning lady.”

“What I love about theatre and stage productions is the art of the moment. Anything happening on the stage, depending on—could be any kind of stage—is happening in the moment. You will never be able to do anything the same five minutes after. I think that’s what I love the most.” She also loves the comradery and the team effort that goes into staging a production.

She tells Todd that the mountains near Oslo, Norway are very different than the Adirondacks. The latitude of Norway is about the same as Alaska, or northern Canada. The mountains are more barren, and their vegetation stops half way up. The peaks are granite. She says the pine trees are different, that Norway has less soil and the greens are not as lush as in the Adirondacks.

Next summer, Kristina is going to see where she is in life, and if coming back to the Adirondacks seems a good fit, she will return. She says, “The Adirondacks kind of pulls you in, wants you to come back. Even as far away as Norway—and we have our own mountains and forests.”

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