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Daniel Wilt, newly appointed APA commissioner.  Photo: Adirondack Park Agency
Daniel Wilt, newly appointed APA commissioner. Photo: Adirondack Park Agency

Finch lands top APA agenda

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The Adirondack Park Agency gathers today in Ray Brook for a two-day meeting that will focus on the new Finch Pruyn lands.

Commissioners will consider alternate plans for managing the vast new public lands purchased as part of a deal engineered by the Adirondack Nature Conservancy.

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Reported by

Brian Mann
Adirondack Bureau Chief

The Finch Pruyn conservation deal is one of the largest in the Park’s history, adding tens of thousands of acres to the forest preserve and opening new lakes and stretches of river to public access.

Karen Feldman, newly appointed APA commissioner.  Photo: Adirondack Park Agency
Karen Feldman, newly appointed APA commissioner. Photo: Adirondack Park Agency
After a lengthy public hearing process, the APA will now consider different management options for the land.  The zoning standards decided by the Park Agency will shape the kind of recreation allowed – ranging from canoes to float planes.

Today, commissioners will hear a remarkable full-day presentation on the Finch lands, hearing details about existing infrastructure, environmental challenges, and the economic opportunities that might follow this deal for tourism businesses.

There are also two sessions designated, today and tomorrow, for APA board members to just ask questions.  It’s unclear whether a final vote will be taken this week.

Proceedings today and tomorrow will be webcast live by the APA.  Click here to find the Agency's media page.

Sitting at the table will be two new commissioners, Karen Feldman and Daniel Wilt, both appointed in June by Governor Andrew Cuomo and confirmed by the state Senate.

One other item on the agenda will be an update on efforts to clean up contamination at the J&L mill site in southern St. Lawrence County.   The brownfield site in the town of Clifton has been a problem since the late 1970s.

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