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"Electing a coroner is a holdover from British Common Law." Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/36606530@N00/4608471444/">Degi Hari</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
"Electing a coroner is a holdover from British Common Law." Photo: Degi Hari, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Talking with a voter about the coroner race

It's almost election day. And in St. Lawrence County one of the races is a public office you might forget about -- coroner. There are 2 open seats this year, and 3 candidates.

The coroner's job is to respond when somebody has died. One of them takes the call, drives to the scene and pronounces the person dead. They also figure out where to transport the body, and coordinate with police, courts, and hospitals.

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Reported by

Sarah Harris
Reporter and Producer

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Electing a coroner is a holdover from British Common Law. Other states and counties have appointed medical examiners who are doctors or forensic pathologists. 

Voter Parker Piercey, from Huevelton, says he'll vote for the person on the ballot he knows best. 

"As far as the coroner's race goes, it's pretty much a popularity contest because up here you don't really need to have too much medical. You don't have to be a doctor or a nurse or whatever."

Piercey says he doesn't care about the political parties the coroner candidates belong to. But it's useful for entering the race: "You have to have someone to back you to get you on the ballot."

And when it comes to qualifications: "You gotta have the guts to do it."

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