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Mike Farrell, director of Cornell's Uihlein Forest, in the sugar shack at the maple syrup research station near Lake Placid.   The evaporator is able to process about 25 gallons of syrup an hour.  Photo:  Todd Moe
Mike Farrell, director of Cornell's Uihlein Forest, in the sugar shack at the maple syrup research station near Lake Placid. The evaporator is able to process about 25 gallons of syrup an hour. Photo: Todd Moe

Why maple syrup matters: from tree to tap to market

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With the start of the traditional maple sugaring season just weeks away, Todd Moe talks with Mike Farrell, director of Cornell's maple research field station near Lake Placid.

He's written a new book, The Sugarmaker's Companion, which explores tapping trees for sap, marketing maple syrup and the economics of sugaring.

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Bottles of the different grades of maple syrup produced at Uihlein Forest last year line the sugar shack's window.  Mike Farrell says every batch of syrup is different depending on the sap and how it was processed.  Photo: Todd Moe
Bottles of the different grades of maple syrup produced at Uihlein Forest last year line the sugar shack's window. Mike Farrell says every batch of syrup is different depending on the sap and how it was processed. Photo: Todd Moe

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