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A train of oil tankers. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/11072040@N08/6184231577/">Russ Allison Loar</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
A train of oil tankers. Photo: Russ Allison Loar, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Plattsburgh rally to demand stop to dangerous crude oil trains

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This weekend marks the one-year anniversary of a train derailment that killed 47 people in Lac-Megantic, Quebec. This Saturday, local activists will gather in Plattsburgh to commemorate the tragedy. Protestors will rally against crude oil shipments by rail through Plattsburgh, the Adirondack Park and along Lake Champlain.

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Reported by

Claire Woodcock
News intern

The protestors will meet near a railroad trestle above the Saranac River. Organizers say that an average of 3 oil trains a day cross the river there on their way to Albany.

Participants will walk on the adjacent pedestrian bridge on Green St., and paddle below in canoes and kayaks. They’ll be chanting and singing.

They’re paying tribute to those who were killed in Lac Megantic by pushing for more state and federal regulations of the crude oil trains.

The event is part of a week of action taking place in the United States and Canada; organizers hope to bring the dangers that oil trains pose back into the limelight.

The Vermont based Center for Biological Diversity, members of People for Positive Action, and 350.org will be among the protestors.

Green groups say that nationally, crude oil shipments by rail have increased 40-fold since 2008. In the last year alone, a half dozen train explosions across the U.S. have raised public fears over the danger.

The rally is set to include short speeches by Plattsburgh city councilwoman Rachelle Armstrong, local climate activist and former public health nurse Tim Palmer, and the Center for Biological Diversity’s Mollie Matteson.

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