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SLU researchers check weight, gender and then tag mice living on the local golf course
SLU researchers check weight, gender and then tag mice living on the local golf course

SLU Biologists Hit the Links to Study Wildlife Habitat

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Golf is booming - even in the North Country. New courses are being built, and in urban areas they can be valuable green space. When landscaped sensibly, golf courses can be ideal habitats for plants and animals. Besides well-tended greens, there are roughs and wooded areas, which are important for wildlife. Trees and hedges provide nesting and food sources for several species of birds and small mammals. St. Lawrence University biologists are using the local golf course to study "unseen" wildlife populations and habitat. Todd Moe reports.

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Reported by

Todd Moe
Morning Host and Producer

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