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News stories tagged with "acid-rain"

NY Emergency Regulations Target Utilities, Acid Rain

The Pataki administration enacted emergency regulations yesterday, designed to reduce pollution from New York's power plants. State environment commissioner Erin Crotty says the rules are needed to protect the Adirondacks and the Catskills from acid rain. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

Bush Acid Rain Plan Draws Fire From Enviros and NY GOP

The head of the Environmental Protection Agency visited the Adirondacks yesterday to address a water quality conference at Paul Smiths College. Michael Leavitt says the Bush administration will act in the next year to curb acid rain and mercury pollution. But his plan is drawing criticism from environmental groups and from top officials in the Pataki administration. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article

New Fish Advisories in Adirondacks

The state health department yesterday issued new fish advisories for 10 Adirondack lakes and ponds due to mercury contamination. 20 other lakes and ponds in the park already have health advisories for eating fish. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

Study: Acid Rain Depletes Forest Soil

Acid rain isn't a new threat to the environment. But its effect on trees and soils has been a point of debate. Now, a new study supports the theory that acid rain can deplete nutrients in forest soil. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Corbin Sullivan has more.  Go to full article

Sugar Season is On, but Acid Rain Takes Toll on Trees

Around the North Country, sugar houses are in high gear, boiling maple sap into syrup. The spring harvest is big business in this part of the world, but it's also a part of the culture. Brian Mann spoke with Colin Campbell, director of the Cornell-Uiehlein Sugar Maple Field station. The research center has operated near Lake Placid for forty years.  Go to full article

Market-based Approach to Mercury Reductions

For the first time, the U.S. government is preparing to regulate mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. Part of the administration's proposal is to use a market-based approach, called "cap-and-trade." People in the energy business say "cap-and-trade" programs are proven tools to protect the environment at a lower cost. But some critics say a pollutant as toxic as mercury should have a more traditional and tougher regulatory program. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Erin Toner reports.  Go to full article

Proposed Power Plant Restrictions Could Cut Acid Rain

The Bush Administration is proposing new restrictions on power plants in the eastern U.S. which some environmental groups say would cure the problem of acid rain in the Adirondacks. The EPA announced the new policy late Thursday. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

Adk Council Urges Congress to Approve Anti-Acid Rain Bill

An Adirondack based environmental group is urging Congress to act to curb pollution emissions that lead to acid rain, before this year's session comes to a close. Karen DeWitt reports.  Go to full article

McHugh: Adk Council's Call to Action "Realistic"

Though he doesn't support the President's "clear skies" plan, Congressman John McHugh called the Adirondack Council's call for action yesterday "realistic".  Go to full article
Photo © 2002 Adirondack Daily Enterprise, Michele Buck
Photo 2002 Adirondack Daily Enterprise, Michele Buck

Sorting Out Clear Skies

On Earth Day in 2002, President George Bush visited the Adirondacks to talk about acid rain - and introduce the plan he calls "Clear Skies". The President said his "clear skies" plan would revolutionize environmental law - ending acid rain, without crippling industry. Critics say the plan would allow heavy pollution to continue for decades. In this story from last year, Brian Mann sorts out how the "clear skies" plan would work:  Go to full article

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