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News stories tagged with "acting"

Ann Barber (L) and Wanda Renick (R) share a laugh in this publicity photo from the Grasse River Players 1992 production of "Mornings at Seven" in Canton.  Photo:  Grasse River Players
Ann Barber (L) and Wanda Renick (R) share a laugh in this publicity photo from the Grasse River Players 1992 production of "Mornings at Seven" in Canton. Photo: Grasse River Players

Grasse River Players stages 40 years of community theater, friendships

It started in 1974 with a small group of theatre lovers in Canton wanting to build an outlet for creativity. This weekend, the Grasse River Players celebrates 40 years of producing a wide variety of theater, from radio plays, to musicals to original full length dramas. The community theater group's annual meeting is on Sunday (7 pm) at the Unitarian Universalist Church in Canton. Everyone is welcome.

Todd Moe sat down with two charter members of the Grasse River Players -- Wanda Renick and Carole Berard -- for their favorite local theatrical moments, and spoke with GRP board president, Elaine Kuracina, about plans for the future.  Go to full article
Peter Shelburne (center) and the cast/crew of <i>Stealing the Packard</i>.  It'll be performed Friday, August 2nd and Saturday, August 3rd at 7:30pm at the Russell Opera House. Photo:  Grasse River Players
Peter Shelburne (center) and the cast/crew of Stealing the Packard. It'll be performed Friday, August 2nd and Saturday, August 3rd at 7:30pm at the Russell Opera House. Photo: Grasse River Players

Preview: "Stealing the Packard"

It's in the title, but the 1952 Packard -- a classic, luxury car -- is no where to be found in the play. That's the premise of Peter Shelburne's newest comedic drama. The show gets its world premiere by the Grasse River Players at the historic Russell Opera House this weekend. The entire show is set in a family's garage and includes a multi-generational cast. Todd Moe talks with playwright Peter Shelburne, actor Libby Brandt and director Dorothy Mallam.  Go to full article
Eric Craig as Hamlet, Paul Rainville as the Gravedigger in <i>Hamlet</i>. Photo: St. Lawrence Shakespeare Festival
Eric Craig as Hamlet, Paul Rainville as the Gravedigger in Hamlet. Photo: St. Lawrence Shakespeare Festival

Another summer of Shakespeare on the St. Lawrence

Comedy, tragedy and history are all part of this summer's lineup at the St. Lawrence Shakespeare Festival in Prescott, Ontario. Todd Moe crossed the border to talk with artistic director Ian Farthing and some of the Canadian actors in this season's productions of Hamlet and Maid for a Musket.  Go to full article
Bob Pettee and Susan Neal, co-founders of Pendragon Theatre in Saranac Lake.  Photo: Mark Kurtz
Bob Pettee and Susan Neal, co-founders of Pendragon Theatre in Saranac Lake. Photo: Mark Kurtz

How Pendragon carved its niche in the world of regional theatres

Even though the co-founders of Pendragon Theatre in Saranac Lake, Susan Neal and Bob Pettee, have moved to Maine, the show goes on with new leadership and a full calendar of productions this summer. Pettee took his final bow on the Pendragon stage last December in a production of A Christmas Carol. Pettee and Neal founded Pendragon Theatre in 1981 and have handed it off to a new management team. We'll hear from executive/artistic director Karen Lordi-Kirkham and managing director David Zwierankin next week.

Earlier this year, Todd Moe sat down with Susan Neal and Bob Pettee at SUNY-Potsdam, as Susan was finishing her final semester of teaching drama. They talked about favorite memories at Pendragon and their plans for the future.  Go to full article
Kristina Diseth lives in Oslo, Norway, and has been a summer volunteer at Pendragon Theatre in Saranac for the last two seasons.  Photo:  Todd Moe
Kristina Diseth lives in Oslo, Norway, and has been a summer volunteer at Pendragon Theatre in Saranac for the last two seasons. Photo: Todd Moe

A Nordic connection at Pendragon Theatre

The 1980 Winter Olympics brought a lot of international visitors to the Adirondacks. Kristina Diseth, of Norway, worked as an office clerk at the Lake Placid Resort Hotel during the games.

Diseth made friends that year, and for the last couple of summers, she's been back in the Adirondacks as a volunteer at Pendragon Theatre in Saranac Lake. She's helped out with summer productions -- working with directors, in the costume shop and even sweeping the stage after performances. Diseth retired recently from a college theater career in Norway, and a chance to re-connect with old friends lured her back to the North Country.

Todd Moe caught up with her during a break in her duties to talk about a love of theater and leaving one mountainous region to visit another. That's today's "Heard Up North."  Go to full article
Bill Bowers.  Photos: <a href="http://bill-bowers.com">bill-bowers.com</a>
Bill Bowers. Photos: bill-bowers.com

Bill Bowers: mime and monologue in Lake Placid

Actor/mime Bill Bowers brings his one-man show, It Goes Without Saying, back to the Adirondacks next Monday night. The show, which began ten years ago at the Adirondack Theater Festival in Glens Falls, has traveled around the country from Manhattan to Alaska. When it premiered Off-Broadway, the New York Times called it "zestful and endearing."

He'll perform it Monday at 5:30 pm at the "A Taste of the Arts" dinner at the Lake Placid Center for the Arts.

Todd Moe talks with Bowers about the success of his quirky, autobiographical production based on his life and theatrical career. From a childhood in rural Montana, to Broadway, to training with Marcel Marceau, Bowers says, It Goes Without Saying, tells a funny and touching story of the important role that silence plays both on stage and in life.  Go to full article
<i>The Player's Advice to Shakespeare</i> is Friday and Saturday at 7:30 pm at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church in Prescott.
The Player's Advice to Shakespeare is Friday and Saturday at 7:30 pm at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church in Prescott.

Preview: "The Player's Advice to Shakespeare" in Prescott

Canadian actor Greg Kramer has been getting rave reviews for his performance in the one-man show, The Player's Advice to Shakespeare. It'll be performed Friday and Saturday night in Prescott, Ontario, presented by the St. Lawrence Shakespeare Festival. It's been nominated for two Capital Critics Circle awards -- Best Actor and Best Director -- for the best in theatre on stages in the Ottawa area.

Kramer plays one of Shakespeare's actors, imprisoned in the Tower of London, who has some advice for the Bard. But he'd better hurry, because he's been handed a death sentence. Todd Moe talks with Greg Kramer who says the show is a passionate, and at times humorous, plea for theatre.  Go to full article
Queen Titania, the fairies, and Bottom - with his donkey's head - in <i>A Midsummer Night's Dream</i>.
Queen Titania, the fairies, and Bottom - with his donkey's head - in A Midsummer Night's Dream.

A decade of Shakespeare in Prescott

The St. Lawrence Shakespeare Festival is celebrating its tenth summer season in Prescott, Ontario. The Kinsman amphitheater, along the waterfront, is home to the Festival. A decade ago, a small group of actors brought a production of Romeo and Juliet to Prescott, and it proved to be a success. It's now the largest outdoor professional Shakespeare festival in Ontario, attracts some of the best talent and features two plays as well as an educational program for aspiring actors.

Todd Moe heads down to the waterfront for a conversation with artistic director Ian Farthing and some of the actors for their thoughts on this year's productions of Othello and A Midsummer Night's Dream.  Go to full article

A taste of Hollywood in Blue Mountain Lake

An independent feature film, Begin the Beguine, will be filmed in Blue Mountain Lake this summer. Todd Moe talks with director Ari Gold about why he chose the Adirondack hamlet as the location for his next film, and his desire to include as many local landmarks and people in the film as possible. For more information about the film and auditions on Wednesday: guideboatproductons@gmail.com  Go to full article

Preview: ATF's summer theatre season in Glens Falls

The Adirondack Theatre Festival's summer season in Glens Falls starts this week with A.R. Gurney's Black Tie. The show opens with a matinee on Wednesday afternoon. Todd Moe talks with ATF artistic director Mark Fleischer about the 18th season, which includes Gurney's comedy set on the shores of Lake George, an award-winning Broadway musical and a tribute to Woody Guthrie.  Go to full article

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