Skip Navigation
on:

NCPR is supported by:

News stories tagged with "addiction"

New York's plans to expand gambling  must be approved by voters in November.Photo: ragingwire, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
New York's plans to expand gambling must be approved by voters in November.Photo: ragingwire, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Cuomo will promote "yes" on casino referendum

NY Gov. Andrew Cuomo says he plans to offer support to a November ballot referendum to allow new gambling casinos in New York.

Cuomo urged the state legislature to approve a plan to build four gambling resorts upstate, and possibly more in New York City in a few years. Now he says he will be promoting a yes vote on the referendum in the coming weeks.  Go to full article
Native-owned casinos like Turning Stone would have competition under Gov. Cuomo's plan to expand casino gambling in upstate New York. Photo: Oneida Nation
Native-owned casinos like Turning Stone would have competition under Gov. Cuomo's plan to expand casino gambling in upstate New York. Photo: Oneida Nation

Will more gambling mean more gambling addiction?

New Yorkers have a chance to vote this November on whether there should be more gambling in the state. Those who treat people with gambling addictions say it will likely result in more problem gamblers.  Go to full article
"My association with being a felon is probably the same as most people's: You're dehumanized. There's a stamp on your forehead that says 'you're less than.'" Photo: Natasha Haverty
"My association with being a felon is probably the same as most people's: You're dehumanized. There's a stamp on your forehead that says 'you're less than.'" Photo: Natasha Haverty

Alternatives to Incarceration: Back in the world

Today, the final part in a series about society's efforts to turn away from long-term incarceration for nonviolent offenders. In Part one, we met Jeff, a college-bound young man from Western New York who fell into serious drug addiction, broke into a pharmacy, and cycled through drug courts and rehab for years before being sentenced to prison.

But instead of serving a four year sentence, Jeff went to Moriah Shock, a bootcamp-style, six-month program in the Adirondacks. We left off yesterday when Jeff was three months away from his release, and feeling confident his time in Shock would help him stay drug and crime-free when he returned home.

"I mean obviously I'm not going to walk around, I'm not going to march around and call cadence, but it helps establish certain discipline that's essential through the program, and this is from the heart, I'm not just speaking to build up the program because I know whatever I say is going to be fine."

In Part three, producer Natasha Haverty finds Jeff back in the world, rebuilding his life and looking ahead.  Go to full article
Lunchtime in the mess hall. Photo: Natasha Haverty
Lunchtime in the mess hall. Photo: Natasha Haverty

Alternatives to Incarceration: into Shock prison

This week as part of our Prison Time Media Project, producer Natasha Haverty is looking at some of the approaches cash-strapped states are taking to try and cut prison their populations.

Yesterday, we began the story of Jeff, a young man from western New York who fell into serious drug addiction and broke into a pharmacy to feed his habit. After spending years cycling through drug courts, unable to stay off drugs, he was sent to prison here in the North Country.

"It's very true to say that I as given a great opportunity at drug court and I failed. I failed at drug court. I failed. I'm going to prison, for years. That's the lowest of the low, that's the lowest I can think of before death."

But unlike many other inmates, Jeff was sent to a shock prison in Moriah, in Essex County, which focuses on life skills training and rehabilitation. Part two of our series takes us to Moriah Shock and finds Jeff at the middle of his prison sentence.  Go to full article
Jeff in class. Photo: Natasha Haverty
Jeff in class. Photo: Natasha Haverty

Alternatives to Incarceration: One man enters the system

When Governor Nelson Rockefeller pushed through his landmark drug laws in New York forty years ago, he argued that any alternatives to his new tough on crime zero tolerance approach had failed:

"I was on this kick of trying to get the addict off the street, into treatment. Now this was a beautiful concept, except it just didn't happen to relate to the realities because the pushers keep finding new people. And I have to say that as far as I am aware, there is no known, absolute cure for addiction."

But in recent years, those Rockefeller Drug Laws have gone through a series of reforms. These days, cash-strapped states like New York are struggling to reduce inmate populations so that they can close expensive prisons. Governor Andrew Cuomo plans to mothball two more correctional facilities downstate this year.

And reducing the number of people behind bars means experimenting with diversion programs for non-violent drug offenders: States are offering counseling programs, rehabilitation and therapy, and opening alternative, "drug courts." The goal is to battle drug addiction without incarceration.

This week, as part of our Prison Time Media Project, Natasha Haverty follows the journey of one man through a system that's trying to turn away from mass incarceration. Here's part one of her three-part series.  Go to full article
US Sen. Charles Schumer. File photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/propublica/">Propublica </a>CC <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/deed.en">some rights reserved</a>
US Sen. Charles Schumer. File photo: Propublica CC some rights reserved

Schumer would crack down on oft-abused painkiller hydrocodone

U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer wants the federal Food and Drug Administration to make it harder for people to get painkillers that contain hydrocodone.

Hydrocodone is one of the most heavily prescribed drugs in New York state and nationwide. It's a popular and effective painkiller, but according to the Upstate New York Poison Control Center, it was named in more than 12,800 cases of prescription drug abuse in 2011.

Schumer wants it included in the FDA's Schedule II drug list, joining morphine, methamphetamine and amphetamine.  Go to full article
Jill Vaughan, with North Star Chemical Dependency Services
Jill Vaughan, with North Star Chemical Dependency Services

North Country experts wrestle with problem gambling at Malone conference

This morning in Malone, a coalition of experts and non-profit groups will hold a conference on the issue of problem gambling.

A generation ago, gambling was far less pervasive. Now, betting is everywhere. You can buy lottery tickets at the corner convenience store or place your wager on-line.

Jill Vaughan is a caseworker who handles problem gambling prevention for Northstar Chemical Dependency Services.

Gambler's Anonymous Watertown/Canton/Massena/Ogdensburg Hotline Number: (315) 482-9445  Go to full article

Doctor Arrest Raises Addiction Issues

A St. Lawrence County doctor was arrested last week for allegedly prescribing painkillers to addicted clients who didn't need them. The case is drawing attention to how prescription narcotics are controlled in New York. Dr. Gail DeHart of Gouverneur was charged with third-degree criminal sale of a controlled substance. DeHart's lawyer, Ed Menkin of Syracuse, declined to comment on the case, saying he had yet to meet with his client. Experts say abuse of prescription drugs is a growing problem nationwide, especially among young people. A new state law taking effect next year will require doctors to use official prescription forms, so the health department can better track prescription narcotics. David Sommerstein spoke with Dr. John Dewar, a family physician based in Potsdam. He's medical director of Canton-Potsdam Hospital's chemical dependency unit. He says he deals with 150 to 200 clients a year who are addicted to prescription drugs.  Go to full article

Doctor Busted in Prescription Drug Ring

State police arrested a Gouverneur doctor and her assistant Wednesday for allegedly providing prescriptions for drug addicts and dealers. Doctor Gail DeHart and her office manager Joan Kingdon operated a private practice from the doctor's home. Dr. DeHart had worked in the past at E.J. Noble Hospital and at a clinic in Edwards. The two face charges of criminal sale of a controlled substance. Officials say she billed the drugs to the taxpayer-funded Medicaid system. The state attorney general's office may press charges of fraud. David Sommerstein spoke with St. Lawrence County acting District Attorney Gary Miles. He says Dr. DeHart was prescribing large amounts of painkillers, like Oxycontin and morphine, to dozens of patients.  Go to full article

Schumer to Unveil Meth Plan in Watertown

Senator Charles Schumer will be in Watertown this morning to unveil a plan to crack down on methamphetamines, or 'crystal meth'. As David Sommerstein reports, Watertown has become a hotspot of a problem that's growing across rural New York.  Go to full article

« first  « previous 2  3-14 of 15  next 1 »  last »