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News stories tagged with "adirondack-center-for-writing"

Cornelius Eady reading and talking ab out his nature poetry at ACW's event at Paul Smiths VIC. Photo courtesy Adirondack Center for Writing
Cornelius Eady reading and talking ab out his nature poetry at ACW's event at Paul Smiths VIC. Photo courtesy Adirondack Center for Writing

Nature poetry, black poetry

Poetry is one of the ways we've learned to think and talk about the natural world. In the United States writers like Emerson, Dickinson and Frost have shaped the language we bring to nature and wildness.

But largely missing from that tradition and conversation is the poetry of African-American writers. For the better part of a century, black writing has been seen reflexively as an urban expression, rooted in the life of cities. Now some African-American writers and editors are trying to change that, arguing that new words and points of view can broaden the language of nature.  Go to full article
Can books like this one, by Adirondack-Vermont writer Bill McKibben, still shape the national debate?
Can books like this one, by Adirondack-Vermont writer Bill McKibben, still shape the national debate?

Is American nature writing still relevant in the age of blogs and climate change?

There was a time not so long ago when nature writers shaped the national debate.

Books and articles by authors like Rachel Carson and Bob Marshall helped build popular support for conservation, environmental laws, and creation of the national parks.

But in the age of oil spills and climate change, some of the country's top nature writers wonder whether their work can still make a difference.

Brian Mann attended a conference of writers earlier this month and has our story.  Go to full article
Can books like this one, by Adirondack-Vermont writer Bill McKibben, still shape the national debate?
Can books like this one, by Adirondack-Vermont writer Bill McKibben, still shape the national debate?

Is American nature writing still relevant in the age of blogs and climate change?

There was a time not so long ago when nature writers shaped the national debate.

Books and articles by authors like Rachel Carson and Bob Marshall helped build popular support for conservation, environmental laws, and creation of the national parks.

But in the age of oil spills and climate change, some of the country's top nature writers wonder whether their work can still make a difference.

Brian Mann attended a conference of writers earlier this month and has our story.  Go to full article
Terry Tempest Williams. Photo courtesy Cheryl Himmelstein
Terry Tempest Williams. Photo courtesy Cheryl Himmelstein

Terry Tempest Williams: Breaking into the wild

The writer and activist Terry Tempest Williams lives in Wyoming, but she first started visiting the Adirondacks in the early 1990s. She spoke last week at Paul Smiths College, at a program sponsored by the Adirondack Center for Writing. The gathering drew more than 120 people, including college students, writers and environmental activists. In books like The Open Space of Democracy and Leap, Williams argues for a new relationship between humans and the experience of wilderness.  Go to full article
Richard Stratton's Federal incarceration ID (Source: R. Stratton)
Richard Stratton's Federal incarceration ID (Source: R. Stratton)

The view from inside a North Country prison

Here in the North Country, we're surrounded by neighbors most of us never see. Thousands of prison inmates live invisibly in Malone, the Tri-Lakes, Dannemora, Ogdensburg and a half-dozen other towns. In the late 1980s, the novelist and filmmaker Richard Stratton spent more than a year at the Federal prison in Ray Brook, following his conviction for smuggling large quantities of marijuana. Stratton wrote about the experience for the latest issue of Adirondack Life magazine and he spoke with Brian Mann.  Go to full article
Author Mark Kurlansky
Author Mark Kurlansky

Mark Kurlansky: Making Our Meals & Our Culture

On Saturday food writers and lovers of food and cookbooks will gather at Paul Smiths College for a conference called "Eat Your Words" sponsored by the Adirondack Center for Writing. Mark Kurlansky is author of Cod and Salt: A World History. He's made a career studying human nature through the prism of food and commodities. His new book -- The Big Oyster, about the history of oyster fishing in New York City -- will be published this winter. Kurlansky sat down and talked with Brian Mann about the fascinations and human connections that come together in the things we eat.  Go to full article

Regional Writing Contest for Young and Adult Writers

Ellen Rocco talks with Nathalie Costa, Executive Director for the Adirondack Center for Writing about the first annual regional writing contest, sponsored by NCPR and the Adirondack Center for Writing.  Go to full article

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