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News stories tagged with "adirondack-park-agency"

APA Deputy Director for Planning Jim Connolly gave much of the presentation at Thursday's meeting in Ray Brook. Photo: Brian Mann
APA Deputy Director for Planning Jim Connolly gave much of the presentation at Thursday's meeting in Ray Brook. Photo: Brian Mann

APA redraws Adirondack Map

This week, Adirondack Park Agency commissioners are meeting in an extraordinary two-day session that focuses almost entirely on a single question: How should New York state manage tens of thousands of the former Finch Pruyn timberlands now being added to the "forever wild" forest preserve?

Their answer to that question -- which could come as early as next month -- will literally redraw the Adirondack map, redefining public recreation over a vast area of the North Country.  Go to full article
Daniel Wilt, newly appointed APA commissioner.  Photo: Adirondack Park Agency
Daniel Wilt, newly appointed APA commissioner. Photo: Adirondack Park Agency

Finch lands top APA agenda

The Adirondack Park Agency gathers today in Ray Brook for a two-day meeting that will focus on the new Finch Pruyn lands.

Commissioners will consider alternate plans for managing the vast new public lands purchased as part of a deal engineered by the Adirondack Nature Conservancy.  Go to full article
Tom Welsh, a fishing guide from Johnsburg, speaks at a public hearing on the new Finch Pruyn lands in Minerva. Photo: Nicholas Mann
Tom Welsh, a fishing guide from Johnsburg, speaks at a public hearing on the new Finch Pruyn lands in Minerva. Photo: Nicholas Mann

Public comment period ending for new Adk Park lands

This is the final week for the public to offer input and opinions about how to manage tens of thousands of acres of new public lands in the Adirondack Park.

The Adirondack Park Agency held hearings across the state to gather feedback on seven different proposals for how lands in Indian Lake and Minerva should be classified.

The hearings have wrapped up, but people still have until the end of the day on Friday to send written comments.  Go to full article
A bill that passed the legislature this session would allow NYCO to expand its wollastonite mine onto land that is now part of the Adirondack forest preserve. Photo: NYCO Minerals
A bill that passed the legislature this session would allow NYCO to expand its wollastonite mine onto land that is now part of the Adirondack forest preserve. Photo: NYCO Minerals

What the legislature got done in the Adirondacks; why it's controversial

The state legislature left a lot of unfinished business when it wrapped up its session in Albany. But lawmakers also got a lot of things done, including a series of big measures affecting the Adirondack Park.

Martha Foley spoke with Adirondack Bureau Chief Brian Mann about those measures and what they mean.  Go to full article
Ann Melious, Hamilton County's economic development and tourism director argued for more of the Finch lands to be classified as wild forest, allowing more kinds of recreation.  (Photo: Mark Kurtz)
Ann Melious, Hamilton County's economic development and tourism director argued for more of the Finch lands to be classified as wild forest, allowing more kinds of recreation. (Photo: Mark Kurtz)

Hearings underway for Park's new Finch Pruyn lands

This weekend, the state will open up portions of two recently-acquired former Finch, Pruyn and Co. timberlands in the central Adirondacks. That will mean more places to go in the Park for paddling, hiking and fishing. The access is temporary as the Adirondack Park Agency works to come up with a classification plan for the lands.

That process formally got under way this week when the APA hosted the first of eight public hearings scheduled around the state. Environmentalists are pushing for the new lands to be protected as wilderness, while sportsmen and local government officials want to see more opportunities for public access to the lands.  Go to full article
Bicknell's Thrush. Photo: Larry Master
Bicknell's Thrush. Photo: Larry Master

Emergency Adk tower plan worries bird experts

A plan to build and upgrade emergency communications towers on four summits in the Adirondack Park is sparking new controversy because of the possible impact on a rare songbird called the Bicknell's thrush. The thrush is a "species of concern" in New York, because of its dwindling population and its small, alpine breeding area.

Last winter, the Adirondack Park Agency set strict rules for the construction project, designed to limit any impacts on the songbird. But facing pressure from local leaders, the APA decided earlier this month to scrap those restrictions.

The last-minute change is drawing criticism from scientists and conservation groups that study Bicknell's thrush.  Go to full article
OK Slip Falls, considered one of the prizes of the Finch, Pruyn deal Photo: C. Heilman, courtesy Adirondack Nature Conservancy
OK Slip Falls, considered one of the prizes of the Finch, Pruyn deal Photo: C. Heilman, courtesy Adirondack Nature Conservancy

NYS confirms big expansion of Adk forest preserve

State officials are moving forward with two land purchases in the Adirondacks totaling nearly 10,000 acres.

State Conservation Commissioner Joe Martens will be on Prospect Mountain near Lake George later this morning unveiling one of the deals.  Go to full article
An Adirondack clearcut in the 1920s. Clear-cutting remains controversial a century later. Photo: New York State Archives
An Adirondack clearcut in the 1920s. Clear-cutting remains controversial a century later. Photo: New York State Archives

Clearcut logging plan sparks blistering APA debate

A plan by the Adirondack Park Agency to streamline permit applications for large-scale clearcut logging sparked fierce debate yesterday.

Supporters of the plan say it will encourage loggers and landowners to adopt better harvesting practices. At the APA's monthly meeting in Ray Brook, some commissioners spoke passionately in favor of the change.

But others expressed deep skepticism about the plan.  Go to full article
Protect the Adirondacks argues that too much clearcutting is already going on without enough monitoring by state officials. This image, posted by Protect on the group's website, was taken from the Bing mapping system.
Protect the Adirondacks argues that too much clearcutting is already going on without enough monitoring by state officials. This image, posted by Protect on the group's website, was taken from the Bing mapping system.

APA backs off controversial clear-cut logging rule

The Adirondack Park Agency is delaying action on a controversial plan to revise clearcut logging rules in the park.

The change would have affected about 700,000 acres of private timberland owned by large companies and property owners.

The logging industry strongly supported the measure, as did many academic foresters, but a coalition of green groups rallied to oppose it.  Go to full article
A clearcut conducted by The Lyme Timber Company in the southern Adirondacks near Speculator (Photo used by permission)
A clearcut conducted by The Lyme Timber Company in the southern Adirondacks near Speculator (Photo used by permission)

Clear-cut logging debate looms in Adirondacks

Next week the Adirondack Park Agency will vote on a controversial new policy that would change the way clear-cut logging is regulated.

State officials hope to offer a more streamlined general permit to landowners in the Park who want to clear-cut forest stands larger than 25 acres.

Only private timber lands covered by a sustainable forestry plan would qualify for the new permit.

Supporters of the change say it will help the region's logging industry harvest trees more efficiently, while also encouraging smarter long-term management of the Park's forests.

Critics in the environmental community say the APA is giving up too much of its regulatory clout and giving loggers too much leeway.  Go to full article

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