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News stories tagged with "adirondack-park-agency"

The Adirondack Park Agency announced its approval of the plan at a meeting Thursday.
The Adirondack Park Agency announced its approval of the plan at a meeting Thursday.

APA approves 1,300 acre subdivision near Hurricane Wilderness

The Adirondack Park Agency approved a new 1,300 acre subdivision Thursday in an area that borders the Hurricane Mountain Wilderness. The proposed development could eventually mean construction of 27 new homes.

The APA approved the project despite the fact that developers didn't include a plan to protect views and open space on the parcel, which is considered some of the most iconic farmland in the Adirondacks.

But state officials did include a provision that will require more planning before most of the homes were built.  Go to full article
APA chairwoman Lani Ulrich. Photo: Mark Kurtz
APA chairwoman Lani Ulrich. Photo: Mark Kurtz

Green group says APA documents show unfair review of Big Tupper resort

Last week, an environmental group called Protect the Adirondacks released a new bundle of documents as part of its lawsuit attempting to block construction of a new resort in Tupper Lake. The group claims that the documents show new evidence of illegal communication between top Adirondack Park Agency officials and an attorney for the resort's developers.

The release comes as Protect the Adirondacks faces intense political pressure to drop its lawsuit. Adirondack Bureau Chief Brian Mann has been following this story closely and he joined Martha Foley to talk about the case.  Go to full article
Green groups say the APA permits for the Big Tupper resort violated environmental rules, but state officials and the developers are defending the process (PHOTOS:  Brian Mann)
Green groups say the APA permits for the Big Tupper resort violated environmental rules, but state officials and the developers are defending the process (PHOTOS: Brian Mann)

Adirondack Club and Resort lawsuit moves forward

In March, two environmental groups and a small number of landowners sued the state of New York, hoping to invalidate permits allowing construction of the Adirondack Club and Resort in Tupper Lake. Green groups argued that the Adirondack Park Agency had failed to enforce key regulations designed to protect open space in the Park.

The lawsuit has been moving forward, with all sides filing legal briefs with the state Supreme Court. Brian Mann spoke about the latest developments with Martha Foley.  Go to full article
Green groups say resort developers Michael Foxman (L) and Tom Lawson held undisclosed talks with APA staff. Photo: Mark Kurtz
Green groups say resort developers Michael Foxman (L) and Tom Lawson held undisclosed talks with APA staff. Photo: Mark Kurtz

Green group suit: secret talks shaped APA's resort decision

A coalition of environmental groups and local landowners filed suit this week, hoping to block construction of the Adirondack Club and Resort in Tupper Lake. The lawsuit claims that state officials ignored key environmental rules protecting open space and wildlife in the Park.

But the suit also alleges that members of the Adirondack Park Agency broke the law by meeting secretly with the resort's developers in the weeks before commissioners voted 10-to-1 to approve the project.

As Brian Mann reports, that claim is based in part on a story that first aired here on North Country Public Radio back in January.  Go to full article
Brian Houseal's position on the Adirondack Club and Resort has been described by critics as "dangerous."  Photo: Brian Mann
Brian Houseal's position on the Adirondack Club and Resort has been described by critics as "dangerous." Photo: Brian Mann

Green groups fall into war of words over Adirondack Club and Resort project

The Adirondack Club and Resort decision over the winter continues to send shock waves through the Park's environmental community.

APA commissioners voted 10-to-1 to allow the massive development to go forward, winning praise from local government leaders.

But green groups in the Park remain deeply divided over the decision. They've fallen into a public war of words over what the decision means and what the environmental movement should do next. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article
Big Tupper developer Tom Lawson says he hopes to break ground immediately (NCPR file photo)
Big Tupper developer Tom Lawson says he hopes to break ground immediately (NCPR file photo)

Big questions linger about Big Tupper biz plan

On Friday, the Adirondack Park Agency commission delved deep into the business plan for the proposed Adirondack Club and Resort. The APA will vote in January on whether to approve the massive project, which supporters hope will revitalize the economy in Tupper Lake. The development has been on the drawing table for years, with more than seven hundred condos and mansions, along with a marina, equestrian center and modern ski hill.

One part of the Park Agency's review involves determining whether the project will have negative economic impacts on the community. As Brian Mann reports, that effort is complicated by the fact that there are still a lot of unanswered questions about how the resort will be financed and built.  Go to full article
Lani Ulrich takes helm at APA. Photo: APA
Lani Ulrich takes helm at APA. Photo: APA

Ulrich tapped as first woman to chair Adirondack Park Agency

Governor Andrew Cuomo made history yesterday when he chose Lani Ulrich as the first woman ever to lead the Adirondack Park Agency. The Old Forge resident takes over immediately and will guide the APA as it makes a decision on the controversial Adirondack Club and Resort project in Tupper Lake.

The governor also made history by picking a St. Lawrence County resident to sit on the commission for the first time. Sherman Craig is a woodworker and former teacher from Wanakena. As Brian Mann reports, yesterday's announcement leaves a couple of big unanswered questions.  Go to full article
I think there's a huge need for more of the Park to be covered, and I think the carriers realize that…

Cell tower boom slows in Adirondacks

The cell tower building boom in the Adirondacks has slowed this year. Applications to the Adirondack Park Agency are down - the agency has only issued nine permits or amendments for cell projects as of early October.

That's a big drop when compared to last year: 28 projects, and 2009, when the APA approved 27. Despite the trend, cell service providers say they're still planning to grow their wireless networks in the Park. Chris Knight reports.  Go to full article
Will Old Forge's Lani Ulrich be the next APA chairperson?  Photo:  Brian Mann
Will Old Forge's Lani Ulrich be the next APA chairperson? Photo: Brian Mann

APA wrestles with historic resort questions without top leadership

The Adirondack Park Agency is meeting again this week without a chairperson and with many of its board members serving expired terms.

Three months have passed since the last chairman, Curt Stiles, stepped down.

So far, Governor Andrew Cuomo has given no sign of who might be chosen to lead the APA, either as a permanent or interim chair.

That matters because the APA is preparing to make a final decision on one of the most controversial projects ever proposed - the Adirondack Club and Resort in Tupper Lake.

The staff is also wrestling with continued complications with another big resort project in North Creek. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article
Stiles has stepped aside, with no word yet on who will take his place (Source:  APA)
Stiles has stepped aside, with no word yet on who will take his place (Source: APA)

As big decisions loom, APA convenes without chairman

The Adirondack Park Agency met yesterday in Ray Brook. It was their first monthly meeting without former chairman Curt Stiles, who announced his resignation in mid-July.

As Brian Mann reports, there is still no indication from Governor Andrew Cuomo about who will lead the APA going forward or when a pick will be made.  Go to full article

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