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News stories tagged with "adirondack-park-agency"

From "The Privately Owned Adirondacks"
From "The Privately Owned Adirondacks"

The Privately Owned Adirondacks Caps a Writing Career

For more than thirty years, Barbara McMartin has been one of the Adirondack Park's leading thinkers and conservationists. Though often controversial, McMartin is more than a gadfly. Her books on the policy and history of the region have influenced a generation of politicians and activists. Until recently, she chaired the state's Forest Preserve Advisory committee. Her popular guidebooks have led hikers and paddlers into the remotest corners of the mountains. McMartin's latest book - which she describes as her last - details the complex history of private land ownership in the Park. The Privately Owned Adirondacks was written while she struggled with cancer. Brian Mann visited Barbara McMartin recently at her home in Canada Lake, to her talk about the book, her life and the future of the Adirondack Park.

NOTE: McMartin is scheduled to speak about her book Monday evening, July 27, 2004, at the Adirondack Museum in Blue Mountain Lake.  Go to full article
Ross Whaley
Ross Whaley

APA Chair Ross Whaley: Everyday Challenges, Future Visions

Ross Whaley came to the Adirondack Park Agency last September from the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry in Syracuse. He was president at ESF for 16 years, and then was University Professor. As Professor, his interest was the political economy of sustainable development. As chairman of the Park Agency, that's still where his interest lies. But it's now focused on the 6 million-acre park, where he sees the potential for a model of environmental and economic symbiosis. Realizing the vision is largely in the future. Whaley told Martha Foley his first year has been taken up with learning the ropes, and responding to challenges he's inherited from the first 30 years of APA history.  Go to full article
Dr. Ross Whaley<br />Source:  SUNY CESF
Dr. Ross Whaley
Source: SUNY CESF

New APA Chairman Ross Whaley Confirmed By Senate

The Governor's choice to lead the Adirondack Park Agency was confirmed Tuesday by the state Senate. Ross Whaley, who lives in Tupper Lake, will take over chairmanship of the APA in October. As Brian Mann reports, Whaley begins his term with broad political support, but he also faces tough and controversial issues.  Go to full article
View of southern High Peaks from Mt. Adams
View of southern High Peaks from Mt. Adams

Southern High Peaks Conservation Deal Draws Local Concerns

The Adirondack Park Agency is reviewing a permit that will allow the preservation of more than nine thousand acres in the southern High Peaks. Recreation and pro-environment groups have praised the deal. Agency Commissioners are expected to approve the first phase of the project later today. But as Brian Mann reports, town officials in Newcomb say they didn't have enough time to properly review the plan.  Go to full article

Lake Placid: Private School Seeks New Campus On Farm Land

The National Sports Academy - a private high school in Lake Placid - is hoping to move its campus from the village center to a farm on the outskirts of town. The project has the support of local government leaders, but some residents say it will harm a rural neighborhood. As Brian Mann reports, the plan faces a final vote by the Adirondack Park Agency later this morning.  Go to full article
Aditi Kaur
Aditi Kaur

The View From India: The Adirondacks As A Model?

Each year, people come from around the world to study the Adirondack Park. Environmentalists see this region's mix of wilderness and small communities as a model for conservation - especially in the developing world. Usually, these groups meet with scientists and park officials. But this month, a group called "Future Generations" has been meeting with shop owners and home makers and factory workers. Brian Mann spoke with Aditi Kaur, an activist visiting from India.  Go to full article

Lake George Hotel On Fast Track: APA Favoritism?

The Adirondack Park Agency meets today, to consider fast-track approval for a major new hotel on Lake George. The developer says a quick answer is necessary to save the project. But a pro-environment group claims that the Park Agency is showing favoritism to a former commissioner. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

Profile: Conservationist Clarence Petty

Yesterday in Old Forge, the Adirondack Park Agency honored one of its first employees. 97-year-old Clarence Petty is a life-long resident of the Adirondacks. He grew up in the Cold River country south of Saranac Lake. As Brian Mann reports, Petty has helped to shape the Park's future for more than seventy years.  Go to full article

Planning In the Adirondack Park: Process Is Slow & Controversial

When the Adirondack Park Agency was created, in the early 1970s, the act called for creation of dozens of unit management plans. The plans were meant to be detailed blueprints, shaping recreation and environmental protection in the Park's state forests. But in the decades since, few of those plans have been created. A $12-million initiative launched two years ago was meant to fill in the blanks. But as Brian Mann reports, there are worries that the planning process is behind schedule and facing some tough debates.  Go to full article

APA Approves New Communications Tower Regulations

On Friday the Adirondack Park Agency approved a new policy that will guide construction of cell and broadcast towers in the mountains. Huge areas of the Park don't have cell phone service. Under the policy, new towers will face tough guidelines aimed at protecting scenery and limiting clutter. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

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