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News stories tagged with "adirondack-park-agency"

Lake Placid: Private School Seeks New Campus On Farm Land

The National Sports Academy - a private high school in Lake Placid - is hoping to move its campus from the village center to a farm on the outskirts of town. The project has the support of local government leaders, but some residents say it will harm a rural neighborhood. As Brian Mann reports, the plan faces a final vote by the Adirondack Park Agency later this morning.  Go to full article
Aditi Kaur
Aditi Kaur

The View From India: The Adirondacks As A Model?

Each year, people come from around the world to study the Adirondack Park. Environmentalists see this region's mix of wilderness and small communities as a model for conservation - especially in the developing world. Usually, these groups meet with scientists and park officials. But this month, a group called "Future Generations" has been meeting with shop owners and home makers and factory workers. Brian Mann spoke with Aditi Kaur, an activist visiting from India.  Go to full article

Lake George Hotel On Fast Track: APA Favoritism?

The Adirondack Park Agency meets today, to consider fast-track approval for a major new hotel on Lake George. The developer says a quick answer is necessary to save the project. But a pro-environment group claims that the Park Agency is showing favoritism to a former commissioner. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

Profile: Conservationist Clarence Petty

Yesterday in Old Forge, the Adirondack Park Agency honored one of its first employees. 97-year-old Clarence Petty is a life-long resident of the Adirondacks. He grew up in the Cold River country south of Saranac Lake. As Brian Mann reports, Petty has helped to shape the Park's future for more than seventy years.  Go to full article

Planning In the Adirondack Park: Process Is Slow & Controversial

When the Adirondack Park Agency was created, in the early 1970s, the act called for creation of dozens of unit management plans. The plans were meant to be detailed blueprints, shaping recreation and environmental protection in the Park's state forests. But in the decades since, few of those plans have been created. A $12-million initiative launched two years ago was meant to fill in the blanks. But as Brian Mann reports, there are worries that the planning process is behind schedule and facing some tough debates.  Go to full article

APA Approves New Communications Tower Regulations

On Friday the Adirondack Park Agency approved a new policy that will guide construction of cell and broadcast towers in the mountains. Huge areas of the Park don't have cell phone service. Under the policy, new towers will face tough guidelines aimed at protecting scenery and limiting clutter. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

APA Moves Forward with Cell Tower Guidelines

The Adirondack Park Agency has voted to move forward with a new policy that will guide construction of cell phone towers. Some critics say new towers may be unnecessary. The agency will hold a series of public hearings next month. Brian Mann reports.  Go to full article

Park Agency Reviews Gravel Mining Permit in Town of Essex

The Adirondack Park Agency wraps up its monthly meeting today in Ray Brook. Commissioners will review a controversial permit that would allow a gravel mine on a farm in the town of Essex. Brian Mann has details.  Go to full article

Adirondack Development: Thirty Years After Park Agency Act, Industry and Sprawl Are Reshaped

For three decades, the Adirondack Park Agency has shaped and restricted use of private land in the Adirondacks. The Agency's regulations affect thousands of property owners and more than 3.5 million acres of land. They're viewed as a model by pro-environment groups, but some locals say the zoning plan has damaged small towns and villages. In this first of a two-part series, Brian Mann assesses the Act's impact on the region. Today, he looks at two types of development where the regulations have meant dramatic changes: rural sprawl and heavy industry.  Go to full article

DEC and APA Hold Hearing on Brighton Gravel Mine

The Department of Environmental Conservation and the Adirondack Park Agency will hold a joint public hearing today to give the public a chance to express concerns about a proposed gravel mine in the Town of Brighton, in Franklin County. The mine is to be located on a 129-acre parcel near Jones Hill, and would require permits from both regulatory agencies. There's been much local concern about the planned mine, with the APA receiving nearly 65 letters from area residents about the potential impacts on local wildlife, the watershed, and the tourism industry. Jody Tosti has more.  Go to full article

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