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News stories tagged with "adirondack-wild"

Brett Lawson, superintendent at NYCO Minerals' Lewis mine, points in June 2013 toward a 200-acre parcel of state-owned land, above and behind the rock wall, where the company wants to mine Wollastonite. Also pictured, from left, are NYCO employees Dawn Revette and Brian Shutts. Photo by Chris Knight, Adirondack Daily Enterprise
Brett Lawson, superintendent at NYCO Minerals' Lewis mine, points in June 2013 toward a 200-acre parcel of state-owned land, above and behind the rock wall, where the company wants to mine Wollastonite. Also pictured, from left, are NYCO employees Dawn Revette and Brian Shutts. Photo by Chris Knight, Adirondack Daily Enterprise

Some green groups turn to courts in Adirondack fight

Four environmental groups say they plan to sue in state court to stop a mining project proposed for the Jay Mountain Wilderness in the Adirondacks.

NYCO Minerals already has mining and processing operations in the Champlain Valley towns of Lewis and Willsboro.

They hope to conduct a series of test drills this summer, searching for a new vein of a mineral called Wollastonite. But green groups say state officials need to do a more thorough environmental review before digging begins.

This latest lawsuit reflects growing tension between some environmental activists and the Cuomo administration over management of the Adirondack Park.  Go to full article
Environmental activists like Richard Brummel suffered a major defeat last week. Photos: Brian Mann
Environmental activists like Richard Brummel suffered a major defeat last week. Photos: Brian Mann

Disarray in Adirondack environmental community, defeat on Tupper resort

Last week's decision by the Adirondack Park Agency to allow construction of a massive new resort in Tupper Lake was a major defeat for environmental groups. Developers of the Adirondack Club and Resort won permission to build more than 700 luxury homes and condos, much of it on timberland that borders the High Peaks Wilderness.

Green activists spent much of the last decade opposing the project, insisting that it would set dangerous precedents for future development. But debate over the resort came at a time when once-powerful environmental groups were disintegrating, faltering under financial strain and deeply divided over the movement's agenda.

As Brian Mann reports, last week's vote could signal a balance of power in Park debates as environmentalists scramble to regroup.  Go to full article
David Gibson with Adirondack Wild:  Friends of the Forest Preserve
David Gibson with Adirondack Wild: Friends of the Forest Preserve

After turmoil, new Adirondack green group forms

Last month, a group of veteran environmental activists announced that they are forming a new advocacy group called Adirondack Wild: Friends of the Forest Preserve.

Leaders of the organization were all let go recently by another newly-formed green group called Protect the Adirondacks.

All this change and turmoil comes at a time when the Adirondack's environmental community has struggled with a steep drop-off in fundraising.

Brian Mann spoke about the future of the Park's green movement with Dave Gibson, one of the founders of Adirondack Wild.  Go to full article

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