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News stories tagged with "africa"

Senegal President Macky Sall. Photo: <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/monusco/8102320043/">MONUSCO Photos</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Senegal President Macky Sall. Photo: MONUSCO Photos, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

President of Senegal visiting Vermont

SOUTH BURLINGTON, Vt. (AP) The president of the west African nation of Senegal is in Vermont.

Senegal President Macky Sall is scheduled to visit Montpelier on Friday. Sall was invited to Vermont by Gov. Peter Shumlin.  Go to full article
A group of students and staff from St. Lawrence University's Kenya Semester Program in 2013. Photo courtesy St. Lawrence University
A group of students and staff from St. Lawrence University's Kenya Semester Program in 2013. Photo courtesy St. Lawrence University

St. Lawrence University suspends its 40-year-old Kenya program

Earlier this month, we reported on one of the longest running study abroad programs to Africa, based right here in the North Country: St. Lawrence University's Kenya Semester program, which celebrated its 40th anniversary this year. Over 2000 students have travelled to Kenya with the program.  Go to full article
The first group of St. Lawrence students to travel to Kenya, in January of 1972. Furthest to right: Peter French; Anne Chene os next to him. Paul Gilbert is sixth from the right. Photo: St. Lawrence University, Special Collections and Vance University Archives
The first group of St. Lawrence students to travel to Kenya, in January of 1972. Furthest to right: Peter French; Anne Chene os next to him. Paul Gilbert is sixth from the right. Photo: St. Lawrence University, Special Collections and Vance University Archives

How a North Country college + an African country = community

This past weekend St. Lawrence University saw a record turnout for its alumni reunion. On top of the usual festivities, this year marked another big moment in St. Lawrence history: the 40th anniversary of its study abroad program in Kenya. The first group of students travelled from Canton to Nairobi in 1972, for a two-week program, but since 1974 it's been a semester-long experience. And the connection to the East African country runs even deeper--each year since the mid-'80s, St. Lawrence has been awarding two Kenyan students full scholarships to come and do their four years of college here in the North Country.

Alumni in attendance included two members of Kenya's parliament, as well as several founders and CEOs of nonprofits devoted to bettering the lives of people in Kenya.  Go to full article
A St. Lawrence University student making music and playing guitar with Kenyans on the side of a country road. Photo: St. Lawrence University, Special Collections and Vance University Archives
A St. Lawrence University student making music and playing guitar with Kenyans on the side of a country road. Photo: St. Lawrence University, Special Collections and Vance University Archives

What Kenya and Canton have in common: SLU celebrates 40-year program anniversary

This weekend St. Lawrence University expects a record turnout for its alumni reunion. And on top of the usual festivities, this year marks another big moment in St. Lawrence history: the 40th anniversary of its study abroad program in Kenya.

The program is one of the oldest college study abroad programs in the world. Since 1972, 2,000 students have spent a semester in Kenya. And the school's connection to the East African country runs even deeper: Each year since the mid-Eighties, the university's been awarding two Kenyan students full scholarships to attend St. Lawrence.  Go to full article
NPR East Africa correspondent Gregory Warner, one-time NCPR host of "All Before Five." Photo: Pearl Gabel/NPR
NPR East Africa correspondent Gregory Warner, one-time NCPR host of "All Before Five." Photo: Pearl Gabel/NPR

Gregory Warner: there's no word in Russian to describe who he works for

The first story listed in the NCPR archive from Gregory Warner dates to April 2005. He came to the station to help us develop afternoon news, and host All Things Considered. Perhaps you remember his occasional impromptu accordion breaks during ATC? We do! Gregory moved on from NCPR after a couple years and many, many creative, touching, humorous, and vivid stories from across this region.

After freelancing from conflict zones in Afghanistan, Pakistan, the Congo, and a stint as senior reporter for APM's Marketplace, he's sort of settled down. Gregory's now NPR's East Africa correspondent, based in Kenya, and we hear his reporting from all over a region of the world that's experiencing tremendous economic growth, and a rising threat of global terrorism. His stories are still vivid, touching, and engaging, and he continues to find the surprising, human stories behind the news of the day.

Martha Foley caught up with Gregory this morning at his home base in Nairobi, via Skype. He's just back from assignments in Rwanda, covering the anniversary of the genocide there 20 years ago, and Ukraine, where he was one of the first NPR reporters on the ground as Russia consolidated its control over Crimea.  Go to full article
Photo via <a href="https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10153850682500702&set=a.10151455321020702.832469.566575701&type=1&theater">Clarinets for Conservation on Facebook</a>, used with permission
Photo via Clarinets for Conservation on Facebook, used with permission

Tree-saving clarinetists bring mission to Saranac Lake

This evening, a quartet on a mission will play the BluSeed Studios in Saranac Lake. C4C Quartet will raise money for Clarinets for Conservation, an organization clarinetist Michele Von Haugg founded with a goal to save the African Blackwood Tree, or 'Mpingo, in Tanzania. The wood is used to make musical instruments including the clarinet.

Over a the last few years, Von Haugg and other clarinetists have raised money to travel to Africa to teach music and plant hundreds of trees. She told Todd Moe that the students learn about sustainability, and that learning music benefits kids in much broader ways, too.  Go to full article
Photo: Claudia Marshall
Photo: Claudia Marshall

Charlotte, VT studio hosts the return of the Sierra Leone All Stars

The story of the Sierra Leone Refugee All Stars is one of triumph: Displaced by a bloody civil war, a group of musicians forms a band in a refugee camp.

They meet some American filmmakers whose documentary helps catapult the group to international stardom. The story and the music goes global, and it's the feel good movie of the year!

But what happens when the war ends, the tedium of the reconstruction goes on, and the spotlight starts to fade?

Ten years later, the former refugees are spending the summer in rural Vermont, making their fourth album with a little help from a lot of friends.  Go to full article
Joshua McGrath, Potsdam, and Ben Hull, Madrid, leave for Uganda this weekend.
Joshua McGrath, Potsdam, and Ben Hull, Madrid, leave for Uganda this weekend.

North Country filmmakers turn the camera on Uganda's water crisis

Our occasional series, "Moving the World" continues with a conversation with two St. Lawrence county men who are producing a documentary about water relief in Uganda.

Ben Hull and Joshua McGrath leave for Africa this week to begin filming the documentary that will focus on efforts to install rainwater collection tanks on community buildings to provide safe, accessible drinking water. Todd Moe spoke with them earlier this summer as they prepared for the trip.  Go to full article
Alan Leo in Ghana.
Alan Leo in Ghana.

Moving the world: empowering a knowledge of economics

Our Moving the World series continues as we talk with a Canton man who volunteers with the U.S. Agency for International Development. Alan Leo recently returned from Ghana where he worked with a group of farmers on organizing their day-to-day operations and the economics of farming. Leo, who grew up on Long Island, has been doing international development work for more than a decade, and his volunteerism has taken him all around Africa, Asia and eastern Europe. He told Todd Moe that his travels and overseas work have taught him that people are the most important part of economic development.  Go to full article
Alex French, Danny Smith and Kayla French outside the new school in Gembultu, Ethiopia.
Alex French, Danny Smith and Kayla French outside the new school in Gembultu, Ethiopia.

Grassroots effort to build a school pays off

There's a new school building in a small community in Ethiopia thanks to the work of three SUNY-Potsdam alumni. Alex and Kayla French and their friend Daniel Smith raised $20,000 and helped build a school in Gembeltu, Ethiopia.

For many years, classes were held under a big tree. The new, four-room school is made of mud, eucalyptus and cement.

As part of our series, Moving the World, Todd Moe talks with Alex, Kayla and Daniel about their grassroots fund raising success and humanitarian work in east Africa.

(A public slideshow of their work in Ethiopia will be shown this Saturday, 4:30 pm, in SUNY Potsdam's Kellas 103.)  Go to full article

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