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News stories tagged with "alcoa"

Elected officials and Alcoa leaders broke ground at the Massena East plant last July, but Alcoa still hasn't committed to completing the construction project. The plant has since closed, at least temporarily. Photo: Julie Grant
Elected officials and Alcoa leaders broke ground at the Massena East plant last July, but Alcoa still hasn't committed to completing the construction project. The plant has since closed, at least temporarily. Photo: Julie Grant

Is Alcoa committed to its future in Massena?

One of the North Country's largest private sector employers, Alcoa, is stepping back on its commitment to Massena. But the aluminum giant still got a $30 million discount from the state on its electricity bill. That's the crux of a story WWNY-TV broke earlier this week.

Since Alcoa shuttered its East plant in Massena in January, state officials have been scrambling to rework a deal that would have guaranteed 900 jobs in exchange for cheap electricity from the hydropower dam New York owns on the St. Lawrence River. The company also said it would invest $600 million to modernize the East plant with a new high-tech smelter. But Alcoa's board has yet to sign off on that plan.  Go to full article
Alcoa workers at a press conference in 2007 during which the company promised to maintain 1065 jobs. Photo: David Sommerstein.
Alcoa workers at a press conference in 2007 during which the company promised to maintain 1065 jobs. Photo: David Sommerstein.

Alcoa reduces Massena workforce to 750

Alcoa has reached an agreement with New York State to keep its low cost power contract and proceed with a plan to build a new modern potline at its East plant in Massena.

But in the interim, the aluminum giant will reduce its workforce to 750 jobs, below the 900 job threshold it promised three years ago.  Go to full article
Alcoa's Massena East smelter plant
Alcoa's Massena East smelter plant

Alcoa to close two more pot lines in Massena

Alcoa announced Wednesday it will close the last two pot lines at its Massena East plants by the spring. The news comes after the aluminum giant closed another pot line last summer. And as David Sommerstein reports, it leaves Alcoa's future plans unclear.  Go to full article
Sen. Charles Schumer watches as Alcoa CEO Klaus Kleinfeld addresses his employees in Massena in 2011.
Sen. Charles Schumer watches as Alcoa CEO Klaus Kleinfeld addresses his employees in Massena in 2011.

Should we care about Alcoa's Dow Jones demotion?

This week the Dow Jones industrial average announced it will drop Alcoa and two other companies from its roster, replacing them with Nike, Visa, and Goldman Sachs. It's the biggest change to the 30-firm roster in nine years.

The New York Times called Alcoa's exclusion "a symbolic comedown." And it sure seems like it - clunky old aluminum out, Michael Jordan and "the swoosh" in.

One North Country financial planner told us it was "a sad day for the North Country". Alcoa practically built Massena, and remains northern New York's largest private sector employer. About 1000 people work there now.

But does the slight from the vaunted Dow Jones really matter?  Go to full article
Alcoa's Massena East smelter plant
Alcoa's Massena East smelter plant

Massena takes Alcoa cutback in stride

There wasn't much surprise yesterday over news that Alcoa will shut down one of its aging pot lines at its Massena East plant for good. The line employs about 100 people.

Alcoa says it does not anticipate layoffs, and local officials are optimistic the aluminum giant will make good on that expectation.  Go to full article
Elected officials and Alcoa leaders break ground at the Massena East plant. Photo: Julie Grant
Elected officials and Alcoa leaders break ground at the Massena East plant. Photo: Julie Grant

Alcoa breaks ground at Massena East plant

Alcoa Aluminum broke ground Monday on a $600 million expansion and modernization project at its manufacturing plant in Massena.

Company officials were joined by New York Lt. Gov. Robert Duffy, other state and local leaders, North Country Congressman Bill Owens, and U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer.  Go to full article
Part of the 7.2 mile contaminated stretch of the Grasse. Photo: David Sommerstein
Part of the 7.2 mile contaminated stretch of the Grasse. Photo: David Sommerstein

Mohawks rip EPA's Grasse River cleanup plan

Update: The EPA released its final plan for the Alcoa Grasse River cleanup late this morning. More information is at The Inbox.

Just ahead of the release of a plan to clean up toxic chemicals from the Grasse River near Massena, the St. Regis Mohawk Tribe blasted federal officials for putting the economy ahead of the environment.  Go to full article
Part of the 7.2 mile contaminated stretch of the Grasse. Photo: David Sommerstein
Part of the 7.2 mile contaminated stretch of the Grasse. Photo: David Sommerstein

Alcoa commits to 900 jobs in Massena; Grasse cleanup still in flux

The company that built Massena will keep its plants open there for at least another 30 years.

Alcoa announced Saturday it will invest $42 million to modernize its East plant and build a new smelting the line. The company will also guarantee at least 900 jobs. In return, Alcoa will get low cost electricity from the hydropower dam on the St. Lawrence River.

The deal hinges on how the Environmental Protection Agency decides to clean up PCBs Alcoa and Reynolds dumped in the Grasse River decades ago.

David Sommerstein joined Martha Foley for more on the deal.  Go to full article
Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, in Massena on Friday, Feb. 22, 2013. Photo: Natasha Haverty
Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, in Massena on Friday, Feb. 22, 2013. Photo: Natasha Haverty

Gillibrand promotes manufacturing bill at Alcoa Massena

Senator Gillibrand was in Massena Friday, talking about her "Made in America Act", her first bill in the 113th Congress. The senator said she chose to appear at the Alcoa East Plant for its symbolic significance.  Go to full article
Part of the 7.2 mi. contaminated stretch of the Grasse.  Photo by David Sommerstein.
Part of the 7.2 mi. contaminated stretch of the Grasse. Photo by David Sommerstein.

Mohawks seek better Grasse cleanup

The St. Regis Mohawks say the federal government's plan to clean up toxic chemicals from the Grasse River has improved, but it's still not good enough. The Alcoa aluminum plant in Massena dumped cancer-causing PCBs into the river before they were banned in the 1970s.  Go to full article

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