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News stories tagged with "alexandria-bay"

IJC Chairwoman Irene Brooks faces a determined crowd in Alexandria Bay.
IJC Chairwoman Irene Brooks faces a determined crowd in Alexandria Bay.

River residents make last case for better water levels

At least 260 St. Lawrence River residents spoke with one voice at a water levels hearing last night in Alexandria Bay. It was the last chance to persuade the International Joint Commission to adopt a more environmentally friendly plan for controlling the waters of the St. Lawrence and Lake Ontario. The plan, called "B+", has the support of local, state, and federal lawmakers, including Governor David Paterson, and a broad coalition of environmental groups. But following a five year, $20 million study, the IJC wants to implement a plan that's very similar to the original 50-year old one. The agency says it has to protect homeowners along the southern shore of Lake Ontario.  Go to full article

Lake Ontario homeowners: keep water levels as is

Advocates of a new water levels regime for the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario will converge on the Quality Inn in Massena tonight at 7. The International Joint Commission is holding a public hearing on its proposal to replace the 50-year-old water levels plan. The hearings follow a five-year, $20 million study on Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River water levels. North Country stakeholders want the IJC to replace some of the natural ebbs and flows of the water. They say it would benefit wildlife, restore wetlands that are rapidly disappearing, and give boaters a longer season to boot. But right now the IJC opposes that plan because it could damage property along the southern shore of Lake Ontario. So the IJC wants to implement a water levels regime that's very similar to the original plan. Dan Barletta has lived along the Lake Ontario shoreline near Rochester for more than 20 years. He's been very involved in the water levels study. He spoke with David Sommerstein.  Go to full article

River residents slam IJC plan

Thousand Islanders gave a harsh welcome to a new water levels plan for the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario last night in Alexandria Bay. The International Joint Commission wants to implement a plan that's similar to the existing 50-year-old formula. That decision has been derided by Congressman John McHugh, Senator Chuck Schumer, New York's DEC, and both Jefferson and St. Lawrence County governments. It even prompted an environmental group to name the St. Lawrence one of the nation's ten most endangered rivers. As David Sommerstein reports, river residents are spoiling for a fight for a plan that's better for the environment and boating.  Go to full article

Celebrating farms and local food

NCPR is media sponsor for "Local Foods Connections," three events in early May celebrating the agriculture of the North Country with a focus on local food and the farm-to-table movement. The events will feature food experts, farmers, chefs and business people working toward local food sustainability. The events are May 1st in Lake Clear, May 2nd in Alexandria Bay and May 3rd in Croghan. Todd Moe spoke with Jefferson County Cooperative Extension's Molly Ames, one of the organizers.  Go to full article

River advocates to push for cleaner ballast

The environmental group Save The River is kicking off a campaign to urge Seaway freighters to clean their ballast water this weekend in Alexandria Bay. At the group's annual "Winter Weekend," the new St. Lawrence Seaway chief is scheduled to make his first public appearance in the North Country. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article
A U.S. Coast Guard inflatable boat at Chippewa Bay with deployed oil booms in the background.
A U.S. Coast Guard inflatable boat at Chippewa Bay with deployed oil booms in the background.

Spill drill exposes Seaway response needs

A tanker had gone aground on Whiskey Island shoal on the St. Lawrence Seaway, spilling 100,000 gallons of thick oil. That was the nightmare scenario emergency responders on both sides of the river faced in a drill exercise last Thursday and Friday. 150 people charted the simulated oil's progress downriver, laid booms to contain it, and then reviewed what went right and wrong. As David Sommerstein reports, the exercise demonstrated the first hours after an accident need the most attention.  Go to full article

Teen canoeist repeat champ

The teen champion of Interpretive Freestyle Canoeing did it again last weekend. 14-year-old Jonathan Hammond of Clayton edged out Marc Orstein to win the men's national championship Saturday in Peninsula, Ohio. The tiny sport is like figure skating or synchronized swimming in a canoe. David Sommerstein caught up with Hammond yesterday by cell phone.  Go to full article
Jonathan Hammond of Alexandria Bay
Jonathan Hammond of Alexandria Bay

Teen canoe champ defends title

This weekend, a couple dozen paddlers are in Ohio for the National Interpretive Freestyle Canoeing championships. Picture figure skating or synchronized swimming in a canoe, replete with dance-like flourishes and evocative music, sometimes even costumes. Defending his title is the youngest canoeist to win top honors in the sport's 20-year history - 10th grader Jonathan Hammond of Alexandria Bay. David Sommerstein has this profile.  Go to full article
Coast Guardsmen get ready for their Waterway Watch presentation.
Coast Guardsmen get ready for their Waterway Watch presentation.

Coast Guard wants eyes on the border

If you're among the thousands of people making a splash in the St. Lawrence River this summer, the Coast Guard wants you. Its "Waterway Watch" program enlists river goers to keep their eyes peeled for suspicious activity - the kind of things a drug smuggler or potential terrorist might do. David Sommerstein went to a "training session" in Alexandria Bay and filed this report.  Go to full article
Oil escaping the containment boom around the NEPCO barge.
Oil escaping the containment boom around the NEPCO barge.

The Slick of '76: Looking Back and Forward

This summer marks the 30th anniversary of the "Slick of '76", a 300,000 gallon oil spill in the heart of the Thousand Islands. Thick, gooey crude coated the shoreline from Alexandria Bay to Massena. The accident remains one of the largest inland oil spills in the United States. Many river residents still remember where they were on June 23, 1976. The event re-shaped the way a generation views its relationship to the river and the giant freighters that ply its waters. David Sommerstein reports.  Go to full article

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