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News stories tagged with "algae"

Some are plants, some not so much. Blanket of brilliant green moss, mounds of reindeer lichens, and conifer saplings growing on smooth rock banks between Blue Ridge and Newcomb. Archive Photo of the Day: Ann Pilcher.
Some are plants, some not so much. Blanket of brilliant green moss, mounds of reindeer lichens, and conifer saplings growing on smooth rock banks between Blue Ridge and Newcomb. Archive Photo of the Day: Ann Pilcher.

Natural Selections: What is a plant?

Mushrooms grow out of the soil like plants, but are fungi. Lichens may look leafy, but they are symbiotic colonies of fungi and algae. Seaweed looks like a plant, but is an algae colony. And Indian Pipe looks like a fungi, but is a plant. Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager discuss the ins and outs of botany.  Go to full article

Now is not the time for lawn care

A string of unusually warm, even hot, weather this week may bring the green back into many North Country lawns, but horticulturist Amy Ivy says it's simply too early for raking and reseeding, and far too early for feeding the grass.

She had plenty of tips, including new restrictions on using phosphorous, in her conversation with Martha Foley this morning.  Go to full article

Seeking Culprits for Lake Erie Dead Zone

Back in the 1970's Lake Erie was considered dead. Too many
nutrients were flowing into the lake, causing algae blooms that used up the oxygen. Massive fish kills were one result. Until recently, scientists thought they had the problem licked. But a few years ago, researchers began to realize those conditions were returning. Zebra mussels could be one culprit, but scientists aren't sure. So the U-S EPA has launched a research ship to gather data that might help to unravel the mystery. The
Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Karen Schaefer reports.
 Go to full article

Algae Mops Up Heavy Metals

The Great Lakes suffer from all kinds of pollution, but among the most dangerous pollutants from industrial waste are mercury, cadmium, and zinc. Researchers at Ohio State University are perfecting a way to clean up those heavy metals using algae. The Great Lakes Radio Consortium's Bill Cohen explains.  Go to full article

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