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News stories tagged with "amy-ivy"

Too cold to plant? Too wet? You can always do a little weeding. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/chiotsrun/4631495177/">Susy Morris</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Too cold to plant? Too wet? You can always do a little weeding. Photo: Susy Morris, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

A season of extremes (so far) in the garden

Over the weekend, folks were shoveling snow in the northern Adirondacks, and by Thursday it'll likely be shorts and sandals weather. What's a gardener to do when it's too wet, or cool, to start planting? Cornell Cooperative Horticulturist Amy Ivy says there's always weeding. She spoke with Todd Moe about assessing the garden during what is traditionally the start of serious gardening.  Go to full article
It's garden prep season.  Photo:  Todd Moe
It's garden prep season. Photo: Todd Moe

How to help your garden feed itself

Did you poke around your garden this weekend? As the snow melts, it's time to start thinking about spring cleaning in the lawn and garden. Horticulturist Amy Ivy says much of what you rake up could become beneficial mulch.  Go to full article
Early sign of spring: Pussy Willows from Upper and Lower Lakes. Archive Photo of the Day: John Danis, Rensselaer Falls NY.
Early sign of spring: Pussy Willows from Upper and Lower Lakes. Archive Photo of the Day: John Danis, Rensselaer Falls NY.

An early glimpse of spring

With temperatures expected to reach the mid-50's, or higher, this afternoon, you're excused if you feel a touch of "spring fever" today. Todd Moe talks with horticulturist Amy Ivy about some of the early signs of spring around the region -- from pussy willows and red-stemmed dogwood to red winged blackbirds.  Go to full article
Photo:  Todd Moe
Photo: Todd Moe

Digging in the dirt, indoors

Many gardeners enjoy sharing perennials during the growing season. Horticulturist Amy Ivy brings that idea indoors with tips for propagating houseplants from stem cuttings this season. Amy told Todd Moe that this month is a great time to prune and shape-up houseplants.  Go to full article
Mature apple tree before and after pruning. Photo: W. Lord, UNH Co-operative Extension
Mature apple tree before and after pruning. Photo: W. Lord, UNH Co-operative Extension

The science and art of pruning apple trees

Pruning apple trees can bring trepidation to gardeners, but pruning improves the tree's vigor and fruit production. If you have an apple tree in your backyard, now is the time to start thinking about pulling out the pruners. Todd Moe talks with horticulturist Amy Ivy, who says now is a great time to start planning for pruning in March and April. She has some tips for best way to prune apple trees - and why you should take the time to prune.  Go to full article
Photo: Lynn Karlin
Photo: Lynn Karlin

Starting seeds indoors: lots of options for onion lovers

Most gardeners probably started out growing onions from sets, which are small, immature onion bulbs. They're easy to grow that way. But horticulturist Amy Ivy says growing from seed lets gardeners pick varieties to suit their own needs or whims. Todd Moe spoke with Amy for some tips about growing onions from seeds, sets and seedlings.  Go to full article
Late blight on a tomato. Photo: Kirsten Jennings via flickr, some rights reserved.
Late blight on a tomato. Photo: Kirsten Jennings via flickr, some rights reserved.

An update on late blight and keeping perennial beds neat

Late blight was recently confirmed in a few more upstate counties. Todd Moe talks with Amy Ivy, Executive Director/Horticulture Educator at cooperative extension in Clinton and Essex counties, about tips for dealing with the tomato disease. Amy also has some ideas for late-summer perennial garden maintenance.  Go to full article
Black-and-Yellow Argiope (Argiope aurantia)  photo: Will Cook
Black-and-Yellow Argiope (Argiope aurantia) photo: Will Cook

Garden spider is intimidating, but a friend to gardeners

One of the largest and brightest spiders found in and around gardens in the North Country is the garden spider, also known as the black-and-yellow spider. They're big and kind of intimidating, but horticulturist Amy Ivy says they are harmless to humans and helpful to gardeners. She spoke with Todd Moe about garden variety spiders.  Go to full article
Hanging baskets. Source: http://www.freefoto.com
Hanging baskets. Source: http://www.freefoto.com

Keeping those hanging flower baskets so colorful

Sunday is Mothers' Day, and maybe you're thinking of one of those hanging flower baskets as a gift. Cornell Cooperative Extension Horticulturist Amy Ivy has some tips for buying and maintaining the "wow" factor for hanging flower baskets.  Go to full article

The challenge of growing fruit

The North Country climate isn't great for fruit trees. There are lots of apple orchards on Lake Champlain, particularly, but insuring a good apple harvest can be a challenge for the home gardener.

Cornell Cooperative extension horticulturist Amy Ivy has tips on other crops for home-grown fruit: berries.  Go to full article

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