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News stories tagged with "anatomy"

Kid's around a life-size model of a whale heart at the Carnegie Museum. Photo: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/nosuchuser/4152475705">feral godmother</a>, Creative Commons, some rights reserved
Kid's around a life-size model of a whale heart at the Carnegie Museum. Photo: feral godmother, Creative Commons, some rights reserved

Natural Selections: Animal hearts

From worms to whales, most creatures have hearts. In a worm it's a simple tube, in a whale it can pump 60 gallons of blood per minute.

Dr. Curt Stager and Martha Foley discuss the variety of hearts in the animal kingdom.  Go to full article
From <em>Anatome Testudinis Europaeae</em> (1821) by Ludwig Heinrich Bojanus
From Anatome Testudinis Europaeae (1821) by Ludwig Heinrich Bojanus

Natural Selections: Turtle anatomy

Turtles breathe backwards; that is, when they relax their diaphragms, they inhale rather than exhale. Martha Foley and Curt Stager discuss the oddities of anatomy that arise from living in armor.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Tickling, pt. 2

Some people claim immunity from tickling, and no one seems to be able to tickle themselves. The ribs, underarms and feet are the most effective tickle targets. Dr. Curt Stager and Martha Foley continue their discussion with the anatomy of tickling.  Go to full article
Whales retain a vestigal pelvis and femur disconnected from the spine--a remnant of their time on land.
Whales retain a vestigal pelvis and femur disconnected from the spine--a remnant of their time on land.

Natural Selections: Convergent Evolution

We think of evolution as moving in a linear progression from the sea to the land. But some creatures, such as whales and dolphins, clearly adapted to the land, then returned to the sea. Dr. Curt Stager and Martha Foley talk about convergent evolution.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Taste

The old school biology map of the tongue, with discrete areas sensing salt, sweet, etc., has been replaced by a more complex picture where the brain averages out chemical reports that vary in accuracy and intensity from many different taste buds. Dr. Curt Stager and Martha Foley savor the nuances of sensory perception.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Whale anatomy

From the bones of their fins to the free-floating and functionless pelvis, the bodies of cetaceans show clear signs of having once lived on land. Why go back to the sea? Dr Curt Stager and Martha Foley examine the tale of the whale.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Brain Size

Does brain size matter? And does absolute size matter, or size related to body weight. Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager talk about the relationship, if any, between brain size and intelligence.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Right Face, Left Face

Most faces are slightly, but noticeably asymetrical. Dr. Curt Stager and Martha Foley talk about two studies that highlight the differences: one that shows how one nostril takes in more air than the other (switching off every couple of hours), and one looking at which side of the face people present to the camera for different kinds of portraits.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Ruminants

Ever wonder about animals that have more than one stomach, like cattle and deer? What do they do with those extra stomachs anyhow? Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager chew over the details.  Go to full article

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