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News stories tagged with "andrew-goodman"

Slain civil rights worker Andrew Goodman spent summers in Tupper Lake. Photo: public domain
Slain civil rights worker Andrew Goodman spent summers in Tupper Lake. Photo: public domain

Goodman Mountain a northern monument to civil rights hero

Last weekend marked the fiftieth anniversary of the murder of Andrew Goodman in Mississippi.

The young man with long ties to Tupper Lake had traveled south to take part in the "Freedom Summer." His goal was to help African-Americans register to vote. He was killed along with two other activists.

In the days before their deaths in Mississippi, in 1964, two civil rights activists from New York State visited the Adirondacks.

Michael Schwerner, who was 24 years old, vacationed with friends on Great Sacandaga Lake. Andrew Goodman, who was twenty, visited his family's retreat, Shelter Cove Camp, on Tupper Lake.  Go to full article
The car driven by slain civil rights activists the night they<br />died.
The car driven by slain civil rights activists the night they
died.

Civil Rights Martyr Honored in Tupper Lake

In the days before their deaths in Mississippi, in 1964, two civil rights activists from New York State visited the Adirondacks. Michael Schwerner, who was 24-years-old, vacationed with friends on Great Sacandaga Lake. Andrew Goodman, who was twenty, visited his family's retreat, Shelter Cove Camp, on Tupper Lake. Goodman grew up spending his summers at the lake. People there have worked to make sure that the Goodman name is remembered in the community. In 2002, they petitioned the Federal government to name a mountain in Andrew Goodman's honor. Brian Mann has our story.  Go to full article

Civil Rights Murders Brought Racial Struggle Home

In the summer of 1964, the civil rights struggle in the South seemed remote and unreal to many North Country residents. African Americans were rare in this part of New York State. Andrew Goodman's murder brought the conflict home for many people. On June 25, 1964, the Tupper Lake Free Press ran a local story about the case. Bill Frenette reads the entire article that ran that day.  Go to full article

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