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News stories tagged with "antarctic"

Can you see the octopus on the right? The picture was taken from the underwater camera called a yo yo cam. Photo: Glenn Clark
Can you see the octopus on the right? The picture was taken from the underwater camera called a yo yo cam. Photo: Glenn Clark

Parishville-Hopkinton teacher coming home from Antarctica

With the continuing cold weather here in the North Country, it might feel like we're in Antarctica, but Parishville-Hopkinton biology teacher Glenn Clark has one on us in that regard. Clark returns to the North Country later this week after nearly two months in the real Antarctica; he was one of 17 teachers selected from across the country to work with the Arctic Research Consortium's PolarTREC program, studying climate change.

Clark lived and worked aboard the RV Palmer, an ice breaker research vessel near the Totten Glacier System on the eastern Antarctica coast, one of the most remote, uncharted regions of the world.

He's journaled about his experiences online, and spoken by phone with his students throughout the trip. Todd Moe caught up with him via satellite phone as the ship was heading north and he was packing up for the return trip (listen here.)  Go to full article
Penguins heading for open water. Photo: Glenn Clark
Penguins heading for open water. Photo: Glenn Clark

Parishville-Hopkinton teacher studies climate change in Antarctica

Have you seen a whale, penguin or seal lately? Parishville-Hopkinton biology teacher Glenn Clark has: He's in Antarctica right now. Clark is one of 17 teachers selected from across the country to work with the Arctic Research Consortium's PolarTREC program, studying climate change.

He's living and working aboard the RV Palmer, an ice breaker research vessel near the Totten Glacier System on the eastern Antarctica coast, one of the most remote, uncharted regions of the world.  Go to full article

Natural Selections: Penguins

Penguins, the formally-attired fowl of Antarctica, are true birds. Their furry-looking tuxedos are real feathers, and their flippers are wings on the inside, bone for bone. Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager talk about birds that fly underwater.  Go to full article

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