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News stories tagged with "anthropology"

<i>Homo floresiensis</i>, left, and <i>Homo Sapiens</i>
Homo floresiensis, left, and Homo Sapiens

Natural Selections: Old "Hobbits"

Dr. Curt Stager and Marth Foley talk about a new hominid species, Homo floresiensis, whose 18,000-year-old remains have been unearthed on an Indonesian island. The diminutive stature of this close relative of modern humans has earned it the nickname "hobbit."  Go to full article
Bust of Neanderthal
Bust of Neanderthal

Natural Selections: Prehistoric Humans

What sort of evolution has taken place in the human species in the last 100,000 years? Is an evolutionary change always beneficial? Martha Foley and Dr. Curt Stager talk about Neanderthal and Cro-magnon Man.  Go to full article

Learn, but not too much: inside the Amish school

There are still places in America where the Amish go to public schools. But here in the North Country, and in most other communities, the Amish learn in Amish schools. The schools go up to 8th grade. They use textbooks that are thirty, sometimes a hundred years old. And their methods are very different. Karen Johnson-Weiner is an anthropology professor at SUNY Potsdam. She's been visiting Amish schools; her book about Amish schools will be released later this year. She told Gregory Warner that the real growth in Amish schools came as public schools changed, in the 70s. Schools got bigger, and a high school education became mandatory.  Go to full article

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