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News stories tagged with "apa"

Are North Country zoning rules promoting sprawl?

What if we're accidentally ruining our small towns in the North Country?

What if, with the best intentions, we've adopted planning and zoning rules that are actually making neighborhoods and downtowns less appealing, less liveable?

Randall Arendt is a conservation design planner and author of a series of books about rural development who will speak this week at a conference in the Adirondacks.

Arendt says from the Adirondack Park Agency right down to local zoning boards, people in the North Country have adopted ideas that don't fit our small towns.

Arendt spoke recently with Brian Mann.  Go to full article
APA Deputy Director for Planning Jim Connolly gave much of the presentation at Thursday's meeting in Ray Brook. Photo: Brian Mann
APA Deputy Director for Planning Jim Connolly gave much of the presentation at Thursday's meeting in Ray Brook. Photo: Brian Mann

APA redraws Adirondack Map

This week, Adirondack Park Agency commissioners are meeting in an extraordinary two-day session that focuses almost entirely on a single question: How should New York state manage tens of thousands of the former Finch Pruyn timberlands now being added to the "forever wild" forest preserve?

Their answer to that question -- which could come as early as next month -- will literally redraw the Adirondack map, redefining public recreation over a vast area of the North Country.  Go to full article
Boats moored at the shore of Leroy Douglas' campground on Silver Lake last week. Douglas has sold ld some of his property along the lake that's the center of an ongoing federal lawsuit he filed against the state Adirondack Park Agency and the Adirondack Council. Photo: Chris Knight, <a href="http://www.adirondackdailyenterprise.com/">Adirondack Daily Enterprise</a>
Boats moored at the shore of Leroy Douglas' campground on Silver Lake last week. Douglas has sold ld some of his property along the lake that's the center of an ongoing federal lawsuit he filed against the state Adirondack Park Agency and the Adirondack Council. Photo: Chris Knight, Adirondack Daily Enterprise

Controversial Black Brook Adirondack parcel sold

An Adirondack lakefront property that's the subject of a multi-million-dollar federal lawsuit filed against the state Adirondack Park Agency and the Adirondack Council has been sold.

Records on file with the Clinton County Real Property Office show Leroy Douglas sold six parcels totaling 17.1 acres on Silver Lake in the town of Black Brook for $350,000. His lawyer says the sale doesn't affect the merits of case.  Go to full article
A bill that passed the legislature this session would allow NYCO to expand its wollastonite mine onto land that is now part of the Adirondack forest preserve. Photo: NYCO Minerals
A bill that passed the legislature this session would allow NYCO to expand its wollastonite mine onto land that is now part of the Adirondack forest preserve. Photo: NYCO Minerals

What the legislature got done in the Adirondacks; why it's controversial

The state legislature left a lot of unfinished business when it wrapped up its session in Albany. But lawmakers also got a lot of things done, including a series of big measures affecting the Adirondack Park.

Martha Foley spoke with Adirondack Bureau Chief Brian Mann about those measures and what they mean.  Go to full article
A clear cut near Speculator managed by Lyme Timber.  Sometimes a woodlot that looks heavily logged is being managed well, while a parcel with lots of trees can be made of "junk" timber. Photo used by permission
A clear cut near Speculator managed by Lyme Timber. Sometimes a woodlot that looks heavily logged is being managed well, while a parcel with lots of trees can be made of "junk" timber. Photo used by permission

A million acres of Adk timberland becoming "junk"?

In recent weeks, the Adirondack Park has become embroiled in a new debate over clearcut logging.

But a growing coalition of environmentalists, industry leaders, government officials and academics agree on one thing.

More than a million acres of the Park's privately-owned timber land is deteriorating -- turning into what some critics describe as "junk" forest.

That trend threatens the long-term environmental health of the Adirondacks, as well as the health of the North Country's logging industry.  Go to full article
A clearcut conducted by The Lyme Timber Company in the southern Adirondacks near Speculator (Photo used by permission)
A clearcut conducted by The Lyme Timber Company in the southern Adirondacks near Speculator (Photo used by permission)

Clear-cut logging debate looms in Adirondacks

Next week the Adirondack Park Agency will vote on a controversial new policy that would change the way clear-cut logging is regulated.

State officials hope to offer a more streamlined general permit to landowners in the Park who want to clear-cut forest stands larger than 25 acres.

Only private timber lands covered by a sustainable forestry plan would qualify for the new permit.

Supporters of the change say it will help the region's logging industry harvest trees more efficiently, while also encouraging smarter long-term management of the Park's forests.

Critics in the environmental community say the APA is giving up too much of its regulatory clout and giving loggers too much leeway.  Go to full article
Maynard Baker's lawsuit sought access to remote ponds and lakes by planes like this one, of Helms flying service. Photo: by permission from Tom Helms
Maynard Baker's lawsuit sought access to remote ponds and lakes by planes like this one, of Helms flying service. Photo: by permission from Tom Helms

Former Warrensburg supervisor drops motorized access suit

Former Warrensburg supervisor Maynard Baker has dropped his federal lawsuit seeking floatplane access to more than three dozen remote ponds and lakes in the Adirondacks.

The suit sought to reopen nearly 40 Adirondack lakes and ponds, arguing that a state ban violates the Americans with Disabilities Act. It followed a floatplane ban on Low's Lake near Tupper Lake.

Baker says he brought the suit on behalf of people with disabilities, but he can't afford to go head to head with New York State over the issue any more.  Go to full article
Governor Andrew Cuomo paddles on Boreas Pond in North Hudson, in Essex County, one of the mountain lakes that will be opened to public access. Photo: Brian Mann
Governor Andrew Cuomo paddles on Boreas Pond in North Hudson, in Essex County, one of the mountain lakes that will be opened to public access. Photo: Brian Mann

Governor promotes historic land deal in Adirondacks

Governor Andrew Cuomo traveled to the Adirondacks Sunday, bringing with him most of his executive cabinet and dozens of downstate reporters.

He made the trip to promote a big new $50 million land purchase that will add tens of thousands of acres to the Park's forest preserve.  Go to full article
The Essex Chain of Lakes will be purchased by New York State this year. The process is now underway to determine what kind of recreation and public use will be allowed. Photo: Carl Heilman, courtesy Adirondack Nature Conservancy)
The Essex Chain of Lakes will be purchased by New York State this year. The process is now underway to determine what kind of recreation and public use will be allowed. Photo: Carl Heilman, courtesy Adirondack Nature Conservancy)

NY to shape public use of new Adirondack park land

State officials say they plan to buy the first big chunk of the former Finch timberlands by the end of the year.

Roughly 19,000 acres will be added to the "forever wild" forest preserve in the first phase of the project. State officials say they plan to buy the first big chunk of the former Finch timberlands by the end of the year. Roughly 19,000 acres will be added to the "forever wild" forest preserve in the first phase of the project. Supporters say these lands will open popular new areas for hiking, paddling, hunting and fishing.

The process is now underway to determine the kind of rules and guidelines that will shape public access, and state officials say they hope to avoid the kind of clashes that have marked past land classification efforts.  Go to full article

Judge allows anti-APA case to proceed

A judge has refused to dismiss a lawsuit alleging that state officials conspired illegally with an environmental group against a landowner in the Adirondacks. Leroy Douglas filed the lawsuit in 2010, claiming the Adirondack Park Agency worked in concert with the Adirondack Council to reopen an enforcement case involving his property on Silver Lake in Clinton County.

Tuesday's court ruling dismissed many of Douglas claims, but allowed the case to proceed to trial.  Go to full article

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